Australia Zoo Wildlife Warriors

Our Vision That people, wildlife and habitat survive and prosper without being detrimental to the existence of each other. Our Mission To be the most effective wildlife conservation organisation in the world through the delivery of outstanding outcome-based programs and projects, and inclusive of humanity.
Oct 23, 2013

Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital

Phil and Ben the Tawny Frogmouth Chicks
Phil and Ben the Tawny Frogmouth Chicks

Phil and Ben the Tawny Frogmouth Chicks

Age: Juvenile Sex: Unknown Weight: 150 gramms each

Phil and Ben were found by a member of the public on the ground after being abandoned by their parents. They were transported to The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital by the concerned people who found them.

Phil and Ben were very bright and alert when they arrived at the hospital but very hungry.  With her first visual assessment Dr Amber noticed that Phil was not standing very well on his left leg.  After anaesthetising him, an X-ray was taken of Phil's leg and Dr Amber found it was fractured.  Ben's condition was good, with no injuries. Ben needed no treatment except for some hydration with fluids.  Dr Amber created a light splint for Phil's leg to support the fracture during healing.  The prognosis for a successful outcome is greatly improved because Phil is such a young bird.

Phil and Ben have been placed in the care of a specialist bird rehabilitator who is very experienced with Tawny Frogmouths. The rehabilitator will not only raise the chicks, they will have to be taught to hunt for their food and what is suitable food for them to eat.

Tawny Frogmouths have a varied diet of snails, slugs, worms, small mammals, reptiles, frogs, small birds and nocturnal insects. Tawny frogmouths often end up at our hospital after being hit by cars as they have a tendency to hunt beside roads at night feeding on insects attracted by the street lights.

Jul 23, 2013

Thank you to all the Wildlife Warriors out there!!

Summer, a common brushtail possum joey in care.
Summer, a common brushtail possum joey in care.

To our Wildlife Warriors

Thank you for all of your support these past few months. The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hosptial saw almost 6000 patients come through the doors last year alone and this year is no different. The last couple of months have been a little quieter, but our staff are preparing themselves for the busy season, also known as trauma season.

Trauma season sees patient numbers increase as a lot of the mammals are out to breed. This means these animals are searching into unfamiliar territory to find themselves a mate, and may end up crossing roads and backyards. This increases their risk of domestic pet attacks and possibly being hit by passing vehicles. These are the two most common reasons animals are admitted to the Wildilfe Hospital, making up around 70% of our patients.

Last year we had 888 koalas brought through our doors and during the busy months we can have up to and sometimes over 100 koalas in care at any given time! That's a lot of work for our staff and volunteers. The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so our staff can provide immediate attention to patients in need. We also have lots of volunteers who give up their time to come and help out at the Wildlife Hospital. They clean, garden, enter data, greet people coming to visit the facility and some, with enough experience get to help feed some of our patients! We are so greatful to all of our volunteers and our wonderful donors who, with their help we wouldn't be able to continue saving wildlife!

Here is a list of the patients admitted to the hospital in the first half of this year, bearing in mind the next half of the year is going to get a lot busier!

January - 710

February - 472

March - 403

April - 380

May - 353

June - 323

That's already over 2600 patients!

Thank you again for all of your support. It is most appreciated and our wildlife thanks you for it!

Yours in conservation

Anna the black swan cygnet. So fluffy!
Anna the black swan cygnet. So fluffy!
Ong a pied cormorant had 4 fish hooks stuck inside
Ong a pied cormorant had 4 fish hooks stuck inside
Callista, our first koala to have a tracheostomy!
Callista, our first koala to have a tracheostomy!

Links:

Mar 21, 2013

Peter the Squirrel Glider - an Adorable Casualty

Peter the little orphaned Squirrel Glider
Peter the little orphaned Squirrel Glider

To all of our Wildlife Warriors

We want to say a big THANK YOU for all of your support over the busy season last year and the wonderful generosity you displayed during the festive season. Your donations went a long way to helping our patients during our trauma season. Although it is coming into our quieter months now, we are still kept busy with wildlife coming through our doors.

In February alone we had over 470 patients admitted - that's an average of almost 17 patients a day! The most common reason for animals being admitted, as always, is being hit by a car. Twenty five percent of February's patients came in for this very reason. Other reasons include - general injuries from an unknown cause at 20%, 13% were sick, 8% were orphaned, and another 8% were either attacked by a domestic cat or dog.

There are a wide variety of species that are brought into the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital for treatment. From koalas to snakes, possums to turtles, lizards to kangaroos, and of course our most common patients, our feathered friends - the birds. Cute and fluffy or clawed and scaly, we love them all and want to give them the best care we possibly can.

The animals we see admitted may be found in the rivers and oceans, or live high up in the trees. They all have different habitats and we try to educate everyone we can about the importance of making sure our wildlife still has a home in the years to come. For instance - squirrel gliders make their dens in hollow trees and line their nests with leaves. They live in family groups with usually one male, two females and their offspring. Unfortunately; Peter a little juvenile (pictured), was found out of place, all alone, with no mum in sight. Orphans like this in the wild may become easy prey for a predator looking for a quick meal, but luckily for Peter, he was found by a member of the public instead. They transported him to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital where he was looked at by one of our vets. He was found to be well hydrated with no injuries. At only 50gms in weight, Peter is currently too small to be released, as are a lot of the orphaned animals that are admitted, but he will go into care until he is big enough to go back out into the wild again.

Many carers donate their time to take care of sick, orphaned and injured animals, but without your donations we wouldn't be able to give these animals the initial treatment they need to survive. Thank you for your support. Without all of you Wildlife Warriors out there, we couldn't continue saving and protecting Australia's Wildlife right here at the Hospital.

Yours in conservation

One of our smaller patients - a Gecko
One of our smaller patients - a Gecko
Emmett the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Joey
Emmett the Eastern Grey Kangaroo Joey
Some of the Cute and Cuddlies
Some of the Cute and Cuddlies

Links:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?