FIKELELA AIDS PROJECT

To mobilize churches to make a sustained positive contribution to the reduction of the number of new HIV infections, to drive education and care, and to support orphans, in partnership with others.
Oct 22, 2012

Children being reunited with families

One of the challenges of working with orphans is that the mother has often lost touch with the extended family. Sometimes this is due to the stigma of HIV, or of falling pregnant, and the fear of rejection by family members.

Some of these extended family members live is distant rural areas in other parts of South Africa, and making contact is a challenge.  

What a joy last month when our auxiliary social worker was able to escort two siblings on the 12 hour bus drive for them to reunited with their grandmother who had never met them. After initial nervousness at meeting this 'strange' granny, the children began to bond, and it was a joyous time for the family. They knew their daughter had passed away but had no idea where the children were.

Our social worker and auxiliary social worker often have to become detectives to track families down, but the hard work is worth it!!  Thank you for your support through GlobalGiving.

Sep 13, 2012

THE DIOCESE OF PRETORIA IS PLANTING TREES

Rev Jessica MacCarter
Rev Jessica MacCarter

THE DIOCESE OF PRETORIA COMMITS TO TREE PLANTING

 

The Diocese of Pretoria near Johannesburg in South Africa has committed itself to tree planting. Rev Jessica McCarter and  Salome Leseyane have called workshops with representatives of each archdeaconry. The tree planting is taking place during September and the goal is for each church to plant at least one tree.

 

Congratulations Pretoria you make us proud!

Jul 26, 2012

It Takes a Village to Raise a Child

Rachel, Nikkie Who Wouldn
Rachel, Nikkie Who Wouldn't Sleep, and Kate!

"It takes a community to raise a child" comes to mind when I reflect on my visit to Fikelela.

Fikelela is being run by a group of very caring, thoughtful, hardworking individuals. Rachel, the project leader, picked me up from my residence and drove me to Khayelitsha, where the centre is based. On our way to the site (about a 20 min drive from town), we both chatted about our passion for philanthropy.

Rachel shared that a friend of hers, Villa, had been the inspiration behind Fikelela; Villa had always dreamed about opening a home for children who were HIV+, called "Villas for Hope". Villa passed away from AIDS, and Rachel has since kept that dream alive. 

Rachel may be the visionary behind Fikelela, but the centre's operations are heavily driven and overseen by Kate, a social worker by training. Over some very delicious tea, she outlined the program's vast operations, of which there are many moving parts: child developmental activities led by Kate, play and care by the staff carers, medical services (TB and HIV/AIDS testsing, general health check ups for which they partner with local clinics), a variety of art activities and fun outings for the children. What struck me about Kate was her unwavering love and commitment to the children; every bottom line she described, whether fundraising, reporting, hiring new staff, working with other non-profits, social works, and government agencies, were all articulated via impact on the children. 

After speaking with Rachel and Kate for a bit, I received a tour of the facilitites. The girls and boys each have their own separate quarters, rooms with individual bunk beds and cribs with their names on them. I arrived during nap time for the younger ones (2-4 yrs), and the older kids were still away in school. I didn't want to snap photos of the children as they were sleeping, but I did capture one little girl, Nikkie, who had woken up early and wanted everyone passing by to pick her up! Her smile won me over.

Even the bathrooms have towels and toothbrushes labeled with the children's names. Kate explained that children naturally want to feel special, and in a group as large as theirs (up to 40 children at a time), Fikelela tries to affirm them as individuals in as many ways as possible.

The children have a wonderful playground at the back of the centre. They're even getting a pool very soon, donated by a supporter of Fikelela. They have bikes to ride around on, and indoors, an assortment of toys and games. 

I spoke with a few "carers" (women who tend to the children -- bathe them, feed them, play with them etc), too, and was moved by how much love they expressed for their work. One of them, Pindiwe, has four children of her own; she works at the centre three days a week, and on the days when she isnt, tends to her children. I accompanied her as she prepared a daily booster (immune system strengthening drink) for a few of the children. When I asked her how she could love so many children at once, she replied, "I just really love children. I can't help it. They make me so happy."

A good number of the kids that come to the centre are HIV+. Yet, the centre is literally bubbling over with love, laughter, and joy. The few children that I saw awake were smiling and happy. The staff were themselves upbeat and positive. And, in fact, Kate explained that they hardly ever disclose which of the children are HIV+. "Everyone is treated the same. If I wear gloves for one, I wear gloves for all. If I kiss one, I kiss them all. Visitors who come in to start mourning are asked to leave. I don't need them bringing in that energy. My kids are happy."

Everyone working there spoke frankly about the love and passion they have for the work they do, but were also realistic and forthcoming about challenges; despite having a stellar reputation with the department of social services -- who are constantly recommending them -- it's clear that Fikelela is an organization that is always working proactively to do better, for the sake of their children.

Villa, the woman who inspired Rachel, and consequently, the staff at Fikelela to care for children living with HIV/AIDS, would be so proud. 

A Mural Painted by the Children
A Mural Painted by the Children
Everyone is Special Enough for a Bathroom Station
Everyone is Special Enough for a Bathroom Station
Fikelela Carers, All Smiles
Fikelela Carers, All Smiles

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