East Africa Aid Foundation

Our mission is to provide an opportunity, a helping hand, for those who have little-to-none to live by and learn with. We are a not-for-profit organization founded to assist with the collection of charitable donations from interested parties, multinational corporations, and healthcare organizations to fund educational & healthcare projects in multiple locations in the East Africa region.
Apr 10, 2014

Quarterly Report Supporting Secondary Students

Two Students
Two Students

Healthcare Volunteer Uganda (HVU) continues the struggle lobbying for support to promote education
of orphans and vulnerable young people providing them with tuition fees and scholastic materials which
are essential for facilitating their learning at school. Many families where OVCs come from live  under
distressed conditions, even some children live on their own and as such cannot afford secondary school
education. Many of Students who cannot afford the requirements of being at school have continued to
drop out of school while those who persist have poor education attainment due frequent miss out of
classes and inability to perform academic tasks given at school.

Activities:

Enrolling Students in need of support for education:

From  January to mid February HVU has
been registering students who are in most need for educational support. A total of 10 students
were registered two of which are HIV positive, while eight are complete orphans and living with
HIV positive care takers. All the ten students do not have assured support for school fees and
other scholastic materials and many have not yet returned to school for this school term. The
total cost for school fees for one term for any given student is $ 150, $40 for uniform, $40 for
examination fees, and $ 50 for scholastic materials. Other miscellaneous fees amount to $120
bringing the total cost for all the items for one school year to $USD400.

Assessing Alternative means of sustainability for the OVCs Households:

In  an  effort  to  promote  the  principle  of  sustainability,  HVU  with  Mildmay  Uganda,  in  January
2014  been  making  an  assessment  of  the  possibility  of  supporting  poor  households  were
vulnerable students comes from with income  generating activities (IGAs). By enabling families
with means of earning an income, these households can become self reliant in the future and be
able to support the education of their children other than depending on donor funding that may
not  be  long  lasting.  Majority  of  the  households  visited  during  the  exercise  suggested  to  be
supported with livestock projects such as poultry, piggery, goats, and cattle projects while a few
wanted  financial  capital  to  start  small  businesses  in  the  informal  sector. 50  OVC  households
were visited for this exercise and their cases documented.

Life examples:

Shamim aged 16 and Hamadah  aged 13  attends  school  at  St. Francis  S.S.S Nansana  and  MK Crown Academy respectively. The two are siblings and were born in the rural Rakai district. They lost their mother in 2004 and their father in 2008 due to HIV/AIDS. The dual have  been  registered  for  the  HVU  education  support program and have been leaving under the support of their paternal uncle who cannot do much anymore at this time given his poor financial situation. Shamim is in secondary form  four  while  Hamadah  is  in  secondary  from  two,  but they are not sure of their future in school at the moment.

The two are part of the 10 students who were enrolled for potential benefit from the education support program.

Dec 25, 2013

Volunteer Diary Week 11

Beginning of this week I was in Dar to pay the rent. Poor Sofie got sick so I and Mathilde continued with the home visits. Tuesday morning I met our new landlord and paid the rent for UKUN for six months as it was agreed. We got one month free due to our renovation work. Unfortunately I only received a receipt as the landlord Omari did not have contract for us. I asked him to provide me one, which I will pick up on my next visit to Dar.

Whilst in Dar Sophie got sick with diarrhoea and Mathilde took Mr Captain to his hospital appointment and showered him alone. He had again had an accident with bowels. Poor Mathilde with her little Kiswahili managed so well at the hospital and had a big job alone to shower him and do his laundry.  Mr Captain had his CD4 checked and will be told results on his next appointment. He was told it is chronic diarrhoea that is very common on patients on ARV medication. We gave him ‘pampers’ but he thought to use it as a toilet so we had to discontinue this! Sophie was better by the end of the week and all the team was back together.

On Wednesday we visited Mariam and bought her more juice, gloves and disinfectant. She also needed more Septrin, which I asked Charles to take there. Mariam appeared fine. After that we visited Amina for physiotherapy who is doing well and Mr Captain who had had no diarrhoea that day! 

On Thursday we went to Muhimbili once again with Hamisi to get his fit status for surgery and Sulemani to get his biopsy results. This time it was me, Mathilde and a local friend Omari to come as a translator. We found a new driver Ally who is also works at the Bagamoyo Hospital. This time the trip was not too long; we left to Dar at 6.30am and came back to Bagamoyo before sunset time. Sulemani was seen first and he only got told that his results were not ready and that he should return next week Friday, not good! Hamisi got really good news; he was told that he was fit for the surgery (double mastectomy). Not only that, he got a date for his surgery and only just over two months wait. He needs to be admitted to Muhimbili on 6th of August 2013 and they will operate on the 9th. Hamisi and we were so happy. On our way back home we bought lunch for everyone; rice, ugali, fish and beans.  We booked Ally for the next week’s trip to Muhimbili with Sulemani and he only wants to charge us the petrol money and nothing extra so we have another volunteer now!

Abdullah finally got his injections for TB from Bagamoyo Hospital. He needs to have still half of the injections from the total of 56. There was a three week gap, which is not good for the adherence and resistance.

We continued writing weekly reports and wrote separate reports of the Muhimbili trips and the office opening party. It is hard to sit in front of the laptop for hours in this heat but we go to do our work in Poa Poa restaurant, which has good fans and serves lovely iced coffee!

Next week is the final week of the musketeers Sophie and Mathilde so we have a lot of organizing to do. 

Dec 25, 2013

UKUN Volunteer Diary (Week 12)

This week was a sad and busy week for me, the girls and our patients. We visited all clients and girls said goodbyes. We also did another trip to Muhimbili Hospital.

Monday and Thursday was spent with Mr Captain with showers and laundry. He also got a new mattress; bigger one and better quality. On Thursday we went to visit Amina and Hamisi Tanga first and girls said goodbyes. After that it was Mr Captain’s turn. After showering him we took him for a walk in his wheelchair. We went with him to visit Hadija and her family who live nearby and girls said goodbyes there. Mr Captain was happy to see Hadija.  Then we took him for a goodbye lunch in a local restaurant. He was very happy but had no appetite to eat much. Girls found it hard to say goodbyes and promised to come back before the end of the year.

Girls spent a lot of time this week with Abdullah. They have created such a special friendship with him now and I am sure Abdullah will also miss them so much. On Wednesday we went to join Abdullah to a HIV children’s group BaoBao, which is run by great local volunteers George and Bernard and they often get other foreign volunteers to work with them. Most of the children were much younger than Abdullah who is 17 years of age and he was not joining in fully. This could have just been due to nerves as the both leaders said. We played ball games and had snacks with them after. This group meets every Wednesday afternoon for few hours and Saturdays for the full day 9am till 5pm. They have activities like games, exercises, life skills, counselling and days at the beach or swimming pool. On Saturday we went with him and the group to swimming pool in a nice hotel and spent the whole day there. Abdullah does not know how to swim and he had so many teachers there. He really enjoyed this day and all the children got ‘chips mayai’ (chips- omelette) to eat and were so happy!

On Wednesday there was a meeting here at UKUN with local home- care volunteers, which Charles attended.  We had organized them to come here with their supervisor. They are not active anymore and most are lacking motivation and supplies. I wanted to take some of the burden away and work together with them. Charles asked for their ‘bed-ridden’ patients but they said all the patients need to be reassessed for their needs before they can give us information. They promised to come back on Friday for another meeting having to have reassessed the patients, however they cancelled it. I will go next week to the hospital to find the supervisor again, mama Kizunga.

On Friday I and Sophie took Sulemani back to Muhimbili Hospital in Dar Es Salaam to get his biopsy results.  Last week they told us they were not ready and asked to come on this day. We left again early at 6.30am with the same driver Ally as last time. Unfortunately we received the same news again that the results were still not ready! I got little angry with the doctors as we had come from really far twice and spent a lot of time and money for the car. One of the doctors then organized to get the results that had to come from a different hospital in Dar. We waited about an hour and then they told me Sulemani has carcinoma (cancer) in situ in his bottom. I was told not to tell the patient yet but come back next week to admit him to the hospital. He will need a surgery or maybe radiotherapy. This was really sad news but at least it was now found and we could start treating it. Doctors think it can be detected early and he will be fine. I have to call back on Monday to get the date to go there.

On Sunday we had a leaving meal with Charles and Abdullah and the girls in town. We followed this with ice cream bar for deserts! I hope Mathilde and Sophie will be back soon, it will be extremely difficult to find as wonderful hard- working volunteers as they are!

Next week I will have things to sort out in home visits and I won’t have volunteers with me.  There is also another trip to Muhimbili and meetings with Hannah to look at UKUN’s future plans, structure and funding options.

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