COMMUNITY HEALTH AFRICA TRUST

To mitigate suffering and poverty through integrated mobile health services providing education and provision of reproductive health, immunization, basic curative and education on the dangers of female genital mutilation
Apr 29, 2012

A Rise in Reproductive Health Education for Youth

Reproductive Health Lesson
Reproductive Health Lesson

Jambo!


Thank you for donating to CHAT's Family Planning and Environmental Initiative.
The team has been busy since January, thanks in part to your contributions.Over the past three months over 2,500 women received long term contraceptives (3-5 years), 1,344 women received the short term contraceptive (3 month), and 430 women are taking oral contraceptives.


One of the most promising bits of data are the number of school children who have been educated on Family Planning and Reproductive Health: 2,934. Pregnancies often begin at a young age for the individuals we work with, 14, and in some cases, 12 and 13. These are difficult ages to imagine both bearing and raising babies, especially healthy babies.


For this reason, education on and access to Family Planning is crucial for their future growth; both in terms of their health and their education. The number of youth practicing birth control has risen to 4,508 in the last few months. We hope to see this rise as we continue to educate on the benefits of Family Planning and continue to provide reliable and affordable options for them. In Laikipia county, one out of approximately 47 counties in Kenya, and one of the counties in which we work, 75,000 women currently want, but cannot gain access to Family Planning methods.


There is always work to be done! And we thank you for your contributions that continue to fuel us.

Lots of Salaams, as always.

The Team at CHAT

"The birds and the bees.."
"The birds and the bees.."
Young girl with baby
Young girl with baby
Apr 3, 2012

All In A Day's Work

view from the yellow 4x4
view from the yellow 4x4

Jambo.

We hope this report finds everyone well. I have been reading through some field accounts from a recent volunteer named, Geeta who has written some wonderful, accurate accounts of life on the road with the mobile clinic. The way in which this account is written illustrates just how active, but more importantly, how flexible the team is, how hard they work, and how they are out there, getting the job done. Pictures she refers to, you will see at the end of the article.

Enjoy the read, and thank you again for your generous donations.

~ The Team at CHAT

 

What an adventure – what amazing work I am seeing and participating in. I returned day before yesterday from 10 days out in the field, camping first at a campsite on a large mzungu (white) ranch, then at the district Health Office.
Here are a few images of our days with mainly the Samburu, Turkana, and Kikuyu people, A woman brings a newborn for a first check. She forms a bond with the team for family planning at the next visit.

We helped   29 women in the slums with family planning –  in a day.  These are “street girls” examining our mobilizer Violet’s implant.

We go out over bad roads and across fields.

We are setting up under trees, in the bush and by rivers.

We are using churches.

Patients waiting outside a vacant workers cottage. We used the inside.  

A Kikuyu former Coca Cola secretary, came back to the land to be a farmer.  She speaks perfect English and translated for me.

We are using the back of the truck at the district health offices where we are camping.

We used a nursery school in Samburu village.  From 8-12AM 60 2-4 year olds study in the government built school. The Samburu villagers pay the teacher.


We went to district health substations augmenting their staffing, seeing Somali and Kikuyu women, who finally said, enough.

We placed condoms in guard stations and gave to people asking for them to share with their friends and neighbors.


Peter, our driver, who knows every road and short-cut across the fields and greets many as friends, as we wait at a production farm for the workers to finish.


At the end of the day, back to camp through glorious sunsets.  Peter and Anna enjoyed my Indian cooking or I experienced their ugali (a large cornmeal cake) and ghideri (soaked dried corn and beans).

Peter, our driver
Peter, our driver
somali woman who had said "enough"
somali woman who had said "enough"
A Typical clinic scene
A Typical clinic scene
Jan 25, 2012

An Intimate Glimpse of On-The-Ground Work

House Visit
House Visit

Hello to all of our donors,

About a month ago, I was browsing the magazine section at the airport newsstand and was stopped by the front-page image of the Washington Post with headlines, “In Pakistan, family planning a hard sell.”

I was surprised to see an article of this nature on the front-page. It seems the birth of the world’s 7 billionth citizen, which I wrote to you about this past fall, has spurred interest on the particular topic.

It was an interesting and, at times, inspiring read for us at the clinic, inspiring because of the many similar goals, obstacles, and methods of employment that exist between community based health workers in Pakistan and our team on the ground in Kenya. It is often a comfort to know others are working alongside of you, albeit at a great distance, trying to accomplish the same goal. 

Both the public and private sectors of Pakistan are putting greater emphasis on family planning in order to curb the countries increasing population, prevent deaths during child-birth and to better lives for those who are born.  The principal means in which to achieve these goals is through the use of community based health workers.  “You have to do this community by community,” states one of the community workers on the ground in Pakistan.

I will attach a link to the article for those of you who are interested in the read.

I have also attached a video on the clinic, which I hope will give you an intimate glimpse into the work being done on the ground in Kenya. The woman featured is one of our dynamic community based health workers who devotes the majority of her time to mobilizing community members and educating individuals on what family planning actually means and how it can be of help to them and their children. 

 

We will be in touch in a few months. 

Lots of thanks, as always, 

The Team at CHAT

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