Youth Journalism International

Youth Journalism International connects teen writers, artists and photographers with peers around the globe, teaches journalism, fosters cross-cultural understanding, and promotes and defends a free youth press.
Feb 21, 2012

February 2012 Update

U.S. Rep. John Larson fields YJI questions
U.S. Rep. John Larson fields YJI questions

Youth Journalism International

There is always so much going on at Youth Journalism International that it's hard to stop, stand back and figure out what's worth passing along. The work that our students churn out is featured, day in and day out, on our blog at www.YJIblog.org. In the last couple of weeks, students have written about an Armenian journalist slain in Turkey, a congressional initiative in the United States to ensure the voices of young people are heard, Burmese Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi, Valentine's Day in Pakistan, the upcoming movie of Les Miserables, a cricket match in Dubai, the Super Bowl in Indianapolis, The Strokes' lates album and anti-bullying efforts in Connecticut. Whew... and that's not even everything!

If you have any questions about YJI, don't hesitate to ask. We are doing great stuff and we are so determined to make this organization grow so that it can do more. We remain heartsick that so many kids are knocking on our door whom we just can't handle without staff and resources that we don't yet possess.

But let me tell you about something that happened yesterday when we brought five YJI students to the office of U.S. Rep. John Larson of Connecticut who was leading a teleconference session between his youth cabinet and another youth panel recently created by a Missouri congressman. Our student team covered the session -- with live tweets, photos, video and, ultimately, two stories -- because it was something of real interest to young people. When it was all over, we asked Larson if he'd mind posing for a picture with our reporting squad. Like any good politician, he was more than willing, of course. Here they are:

From left, Youth Journalism International reporters Kiernan Majerus-Collins, Yelena Samofalova, Connecticut Congressman John Larson, Youth Journalism International reporters Ameni Mathlouthi, Erez Bittan and Mary Majerus-Collins on Saturday, Feb. 18 at Larson's Hartford office. 

 

What we really loved, though, was that after posing, the students kept peppering him with questions. He wound up talking with them for a long while about all sorts of things, from lowering the voting age to the medical use of marijuana. The five of them displayed a raw curiosity, a willingness to challenge one of the most powerful members of Congress and a pure delight in extracting information that may or may not wind up in a story sometime. They were, in short, real reporters there -- and Rep. Larson showed them both the professional courtesy that comes of it and the grace of a guy who's both a father and a former history teacher in dealing with the young. We were proud of them all.
What made it especially sweet was seeing one of our young journalists, Ameni Mathlouthi, going to toe to toe with the congressman. Mathlouthi is a Tunisian student who is studying in Connecticut on an exchange program. She wrote earlier this year about her participation in the Arab Spring a year earlier, when Tunisians led the way toward what they hope will be a more free country. (You can read her account here.) She did more than see how Americans can challenge their leaders and express their thoughts. She got a chance to live it. And that is what Youth Journalism International offers to young people everywhere -- the chance to be part of a worldwide organization that recognizes their natural right to liberty and embraces both that right and them. We try not to put anyone at risk, of course, but we also help knock down the barriers that keep people from being and achieving everything they can. You can rest assured that Ameni is going to make her mark on this world. After all, she already has.

 


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Feb 13, 2012

Progress Report - February 12, 2012

Progress Report – February 12, 2012

 

Door to the Unknown -- Photo by Yasser Alaa/youthjournalism.org

We are still working to ensure that Yasser Alaa gets the camera and equipment he needs in Egypt.

Since posting this project Yasser has managed to get another Nikon camera, which is wonderful. What he still lacks are the lenses and protective bag that go along with it. We nearly have enough money for them now.

We have overcome one of the big hitches with regard to providing Yasser with the equipment he seeks. A Youth Journalism International senior reporter who is traveling from the United States to Egypt in May 2012 has offered to bring whatever we purchase for him directly to him then. That solves a major headache of how we can safely and securely ensure the items GlobalGiving donors paid for actually reach him. It also allows us to buy them in the U.S., where camera equipment is much cheaper than in Egypt, which will stretch the dollars that we have further.

Contributions above and beyond Yasser’s needs will be used to furnish other Egyptian students with still and video cameras they can use to tell their stories.

We are grateful to all of you who have helped Yasser with financial donations and moral support. Thank you so much. – Steve Collins, Youth Journalism International board president

Nov 22, 2011

From the heart of Egypt's revolution

Youth Journalism International's student reporters and photographers are hard at work trying to show the world what's happening right now in Egypt, as people again take to the streets in a bid to finish the January 25 Revolution.

Yasser Alaa, a YJI photographer in Alexandria, Egypt, came back last night with three pictures and a terrifying account of braving rubber bullets and tear gas to get them. This isn't what we ask of our students -- keeping safe is most important, in fact -- but there was no stopping Yasser from being out there in the middle of the demonstration with his friends, neighbors and countrymen.

In Cairo, Lama Tawakkol weighed in with a lengthy, clear analysis of what's happened in Egypt since last winter's 18 day revolt bounced Hosni Mubarak from office. Her piece explains why the people are occupying Tahrir Square again and what it means. It's a wonderful story, from a girl who cares what happens.

We have other students in Egypt working on other stories, too, but they're not done yet.

While we aren't usually in the middle of a revolution, YJI students around the world are constantly surprising us with terrific tales, pictures, drawings and video. They are amazing.

In just the past week, we've had a story from Armenia about Apple co-founded Steve Wozniak's visit there, a story from Connecticut about National Novel Writing Month, a picture of a Detroit church, a stunning portrait of the Portland, Oregon Occup Portland camp just before its removal and much, much more.

You can keep up with all of it by checking YJI's blog regularly. It's at www.YJIblog.org.

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