Global Vision International Charitable Trust

Working with local grassroots charities and NGOs in 20 countries across the globe, the Global Vision International (GVI) Charitable Trust manages and fund-raises for numerous long-term programs. These further the works of of our local partners and aim to alleviate poverty, illiteracy, environmental degradation and climate change through: education; nutrition; conservation and capacity building. Our work focuses upon 3 key objectives, Awareness of global issues, Direct impact upon those issues on a local and global basis, and Empowerment of our alumni, be them our community members, staff, volunteers, fundraisers or donors, to continue impacting on key global issues independently
Oct 22, 2012

October Updates

This year´s harvests have once again been very poor unfortunately and much is being relied upon a good coffee harvest later in the year to help this issue. Inclement weather has also played its part and food is very scarce. It is hoped we can prepare for 2013 with some more donations in the bank to head of potential hunger and food shortages so that we can at least feed the children daily with rice and beans and fruit which is so important. For only $1000 a month, this is possible and heads off a potential food crisis in the region would be awful.

The more donations we can get, the more we can a) implement a regular food program and b) introduce alternative farming techniques which aren't so susceptible to changes in climate, as we have seen recently. Discussions will be held with the communtiy before the next year's crop cycle and we will go from there, depending on the available funds we have.

As you know, by providing the farmers with seeds will help them feed their families and communities, with wide ranging benefits affected over 1000 people. Thank you once again for all of your kind donations which are helping this cause.

Oct 16, 2012

Little Daffodils English Boarding School

In the past week we have been making regular visits to a little school in a rural community by the name of Pame (30 minutes outside of Pokhara) to discuss and organize volunteers helping out in classrooms and with general projects on the school grounds.  Lekhnath, a local teacher, set up the Little Daffodils English Boarding School 18 years ago as he could see a good education was far out of reach for the people in this community.  He has managed to keep school fees down and transport to and from affordable.  At some times this has meant he has had to pay out of his own pocket to keep the school running.  The buildings are in disrepair and could certainly use a good lick of paint.

We took our first teaching volunteer into the school with us on Thursday and spent most of the day attending classes and teaching a few.  We were met with huge smiles from the children and warm greetings from the teachers.

Our aim is to first help the current students with their English fluency by introducing practice activities in their English classes to get them talking more.  In the process we hope to show the local teachers how they could apply these practise activities to their other classes.  Our volunteers will be teaching alongside the local teachers and holding regular workshops with them to bring new ideas into the school.                                   

In just the few days that we have spent there, we have been approached by several teachers who have tried to spend their free time practising their conversational English with us.  This has been very encouraging for our hopes for this project.

Most of the teachers are from this community and many of the women were housewives before Lekhnath hired them to teach his classes.  He has tried wherever possible to supply employment to local people who also have family here.    We believe that GVI’s presence in this school will benefit not only the students and teachers, but also their families nearby as our project develops.  Helping with supplying teaching techniques for English will eventually mean the school will be self-sufficient with a more advanced English program.

Oct 16, 2012

September Updates

Conservation biology is nothing without the understanding and cooperation of the local residents.  GVI Amazon worked long and hard on developing relationships with the surrounding communities. Over the years many teachers, parents, community members, children and even local doctors have benefited from a variety of activities including an integrated environmental and TEFL-based English language program, lectures on local snake species, sports days, science fairs and cultural exchanges (a.k.a. Sunday football!). The money raised by our many challenges for the Charitable Trust has funded a water pump for the Fuerzas Unidas school and community, as well as books and other scientific materials not provided by the government for the local schools.  Our final challenge will help ensure the continuity of a youth-led tree planting initiative that will provide an economic incentive for increasing biodiversity on agricultural lands.    

It is thus that we will leave the Yachana Reserve with both joy and sadness; joy that we have had the privilege to live and work in such a place, and sadness that our parting will be hard for some.  We leave our Reserve ranger Abdon to perhaps a more peaceful life on base and I only hope that the Saturday market will not suffer without our weekly demand for empanadas, chicken and beer!  We will greatly miss our time with the students from the Yachana Technical High School; over the years, as part of GVI’s National Scholarship Program, more than 60 Ecuadorian students have come to us from the Yachana school, initially arriving with plans to learn English, but often leaving with even more: an understanding of our science, our love of nature and our culture.  Those who stayed for months rather than days have gone on to speak English at advanced levels and some have even received scholarships in the United States, later returning to become bilingual jungle guides. We are proud of them and will follow their careers with interest, and are excited for the opportunities for new students once the handover to our partners at Yachana is completed.

While it is tough to leave the jungle home that has provided us with so much, we look forward to our base camp’s new future as Yachana’s hands-on science education center for high school students from the Amazon.  We have spent the last few weeks preparing for the handover: finalizing the curricula and conservation lessons for the students, labelling and organizing equipment we are leaving for their use, and coordinating resources with Yachana staff, whose first task will be to learn all those frog and bird calls!  The base is now ready for the arrival of the jungle first-timers; we hope they will enjoy it as much as we certainly have.

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