The Marshall Legacy Institute (MLI)

The Marshall Legacy Institute (MLI) was created in 1997 on the 50th Anniversary of the Marshall Plan by General (Ret.) Gordon R. Sullivan to extend the vision & legacy of Nobel Peace Laureate George C. Marshall by alleviating suffering and promoting hope, growth, and stability in war-torn countries. A major obstacle in many of these troubled countries is the lingering presence of landmines that remain buried in the ground long after wars have ended. Sadly, tens of millions of these hidden killers are in over 60 countries around the world. Thus, MLI's primary mission is to establish practical, affordable and sustainable indigenous programs to help severely mine-affected countries ri...

The Marshall Legacy Institute (MLI)
2425 Wilson Blvd., suite 240
Ste 240
Arlington, VA 22201
United States
(703) 243-9200
http://www.marshall-legacy.org

Executive Director, President

Perry Baltimore

Management Team

Perry Baltimore, Tycie Horsley, Elise Becker, Lauren Demeter, Tanya Tarasova, Kimberly McCasland

Board of Directors

Gordon R. Sullivan, Anthony Lake, Frances D. Cook, Diana Enzi, Sherri Goodman, Paul G. Irwin, William Lynn, Joe R. Reeder, Guy Bourn, Annie Totah, Masud Akbar, Perry F. Baltimore III, William G. Foster, Jack Merritt, Theodore Stroup

Project Leaders

Tycie Horsley

Mission

The Marshall Legacy Institute (MLI) was created in 1997 on the 50th Anniversary of the Marshall Plan by General (Ret.) Gordon R. Sullivan to extend the vision & legacy of Nobel Peace Laureate George C. Marshall by alleviating suffering and promoting hope, growth, and stability in war-torn countries. A major obstacle in many of these troubled countries is the lingering presence of landmines that remain buried in the ground long after wars have ended. Sadly, tens of millions of these hidden killers are in over 60 countries around the world. Thus, MLI's primary mission is to establish practical, affordable and sustainable indigenous programs to help severely mine-affected countries rid their land of the horrific scourge of landmines. Our programs include the development, expansion and sustainment of the Mine Detection Dog Partnership Program (MDDPP), which provides Mine Detection Dogs (MDDs) to accelerate the pace of landmine clearance operations; the Survivors' Assistance program, which helps those who have been injured by landmines; and the Children Against Mines Program (CHAMPS), which promotes global citizenship and involves American youth in meaningful service-learning projects to help children living in war-torn countries who have been injured by landmines. MLI has provided 195 life-saving dogs to 11 war-torn countries. MDDs have the unique ability to safely and effectively locate the scent of a landmine and then alert their handlers so the mine can be removed; and, extraordinarily, they are able to find landmines up to 30 times more quickly than other demining tools. The incredible bond that develops between the dogs and their handlers is a vital aspect of the success of the MDDPP. The extensive training that handlers and MDDs undergo makes safety the number one priority during mine clearance operations. In the past 17 years of training and deploying MDDs, no dog or handler has been injured or killed by a landmine or other explosive. In 2013, MLI's life-saving dog teams searched more than 3 million square meters of land in some of the most heavily mine-infested countries of the world, thereby making it safe for people to walk and children to play. In 2013, MLI also provided mine victims' assistance by training indigenous rehabilitation teams, administering vocational training programs, and providing prosthetics and other medical care to hundreds of landmine survivors. Through our Children Against Mines Program (CHAMPS), MLI engaged more than eight thousand American youth in the landmine issue and connected U.S. schoolchildren with youth in beneficiary countries to help children who have been injured by landmines. MLI's three programs: 1) educate citizens about the dangers of mines; 2) provide valuable resources, especially mine detection dogs (MDDs), for landmine clearance; 3) train national leaders charged with mine action responsibilities; and 4) assist landmine survivors with physical and psychological needs. MLI provides resources and training to help countries build their own affordable, practical, and sustainable humanitarian demining programs.

Programs

MLI's longest running and most well-known program is the Mine Detection Dog Partnership Program (MDDPP), which works to increase the quality and quantity of life-saving Mine Detection Dogs (MDDs) in countries severely affected by landmines. Remarkably, MDDs have proven to be one of the most valuable tools in mine detection, locating landmines 30 times more quickly than detection tools. During 2013, MLI's Mine Detection Dog (MDD) teams cleared more than 3 million square meters land in some of the most heavily mine-infested countries of the world, thereby making it safe for people to walk and children to play. MLI recently expanded its MDD program and initiated the first MDD program in Angola and re-initiated an MDD program in Sri Lanka. To date, MLI has donated 195 lifesaving MDDs and has helped establish or expand indigenous MDD programs in Afghanistan, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Eritrea, Lebanon, Nicaragua, Iraq, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Hundreds more life-saving dogs are needed to help remove these hidden killers from the land so that war-torn countries can begin to rebuild, farmers can replant their crops, and citizens can truly walk the earth in safety. As part of MLI's overall strategy to build indigenous capacity to remove landmines and establish sustainable demining programs, MLI donates MDDs to mine-contaminated countries and then provides training and support to the beneficiary demining organizations. Typically, MDDs are sponsored by private donors and MLI maintains interest in the program through a variety of means including sending donors regular progress reports, providing landmine presentations and Mine Detection Dog demonstrations, and including donors in program assessment visits to the beneficiary country where donors can meet their sponsored MDDs. In just the past few months, thanks to the support of private donors and the U.S. government, MLI's dedicated MDDs and their handlers have cleared thousands of acres of land that had been filled with landmines that might otherwise have caused hundreds of men, women and children to lose their limbs or even their lives. Recognizing that a peaceful and secure future for the world relies upon promoting global citizenship and teaching young people about world cultures, diversity, team building, and the consequences of conflict, MLI's CHildren Against Mines Program (CHAMPS) fosters a holistic education that includes service learning projects that enable schoolchildren in countries like Afghanistan and Vietnam to interact regularly with American students through frequent, supervised video conferences, and to work together to help landmine survivors. MLI's ultimate goal is to expand CHAMPS so that there are schools throughout the world that are linked together, enabling children to learn about each other and foster a sense of interconnectedness. MLI's CHAMPS staff members travel throughout the U.S. and to many mine-affected countries, speaking to schoolchildren and raising awareness about landmines. Utilizing the keen skills of our "canine ambassador," a Belgian Malinois named Senna (who "sniffed out" landmines in Afghanistan for five years), to present simulated minefield demonstrations, CHAMPS inspires American children to not only explore the global landmine problem, but to also become part of the solution. CHAMPS elevates awareness about landmines, promotes global citizenship, and raises funds to provide critically needed medical care and prostheses to youth who have been wounded by landmines. CHAMPS links schools in the United States to 'sister' schools in countries ravaged by the effects of landmines. By using internet video messengers, such as Skype, the schoolchildren are able to discover more about each other, and the resulting empathy promotes a greater sense of cultural understanding. As part of the curriculum, schools in the mine afflicted countries 'adopt' young landmine survivors in their community and identify their needs, while the schools in the United States are then tasked with raising funds to provide assistance to the young survivor(s), including purchasing prosthetic limbs and providing the funding for rehabilitative care and vocational training, such as computer skills. MLI implements CHAMPS by identifying schools and CHAMPS managers to lead the programs, both in the United States and the mine affected countries, setting up the internet video chats, keeping the schools connected through scheduled "chats," and facilitating the use of funds to assist the young survivor(s). While continuing to work to diminish the number of landmines throughout the world, MLI recognizes that there are hundreds of thousands of people who have already been injured by landmines, and approximately 5,000 additional men, women, and children become survivors each year. Therefore, the Survivors' Assistance program began as a way to implement a variety of programs that assist those who have been injured by landmines. Landmine survivors face seemingly insurmountable challenges in addition to the obvious physical disabilities, such as psychological stress and economic hardships. MLI's Survivors' Assistance program helps combat these challenges by providing prosthetic devices, rehabilitative treatments, and vocational training to landmine survivors. MLI is also currently funding a program that provides specialized rehabilitative medical training to doctors in Iraq, as well as a program that is building a computer lab and providing vocational training to landmine survivors in Yemen so they may learn employable skills and have the ability to provide financially for their families. In 2012/2013, MLI plans to expand its Survivors' Assistance program by initiating a new program in Iraq that would restore hope & dignity among landmine survivors by ensuring access to medical facilities, establishing a prosthetic clinic for children within the Basra Rehabilitation Center and by providing training to enhance job skills & employment opportunities for survivors. Young survivors will learn that they can be active contributors to society, and their training may enable them to re-enter Iraq's educational system. MLI will team with the Iraqi Mine Clearance Organization (IMCO) to implement this initiative which has been approved by the Iraqi Ministries of Education and Health. This project has five major objectives: (1) Build, equip, and man a vocational training and outreach facility (VOTOF) for mine survivors on land that has been donated by a survivor; (2) Determine prosthetic needs among survivors, especially children, and train prosthetic technicians & provide required materials & equipment currently lacking to address effectively the prosthetic needs of the large Basra survivor population; (3) Coordinate medical rehabilitation and provide transportation for survivors; (4) Link American students with school-aged Iraqi survivors who receive rehabilitative training at the VOTOF to assist other young survivors in the Basra area; (5) Gain & maintain private donor support for this cost-sharing project.

Statistics on The Marshall Legacy Institute (MLI)

Financial Statistics

  • Annual Budget for 2013: $2,700,000
  • Maximum Annual Budget: $2,700,000
  • Other funding sources: Private foundations, U.S. State Department, individual donors, corporations
  • Religious Affiliation: none
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