Karuna Trust

Our vision is of a world without prejudice, in which every human being has the opportunity to fulfil their potential, regardless of their background or beliefs. We aim to do this by challenging the ignorance and prejudice that trap people in poverty.
Mar 7, 2011

My first visit to Vishrantwadi

I’ve just got back a few hours ago from my first visit to the project in Vishrantwadi. Wow. Reading about it on paper and seeing it on the ground in action are two very different things. I just wanted to share my feelings, as I’ll write a more detailed report and share the stories of the girls that I met when I get back to our Karuna office in London.

Up until now, I never fully experienced how limited the life choices of the girls involved in the project are. Most of them live in the slums of Vishrantwadi, and many don’t even attend school. I met many girls who used to go and now don’t go. Having said that, I also met girls who have re-enrolled at school since being part of the life Skills classes that the project runs. For many of the girls, even obtaining permission from their parents to attend activities such as computer classes or life skills training has been an uphill struggle. Some parents remain under the assumption that to invest in the development of girls in this way is futile. Karunaprabha, the leader of this project, and her formidable stuff are key in helping to overcome this barrier. It is clear that over the years that the project has been running they have gained the trust of many in the communities in which they are working in. Through open conversation they are often able to convince reluctant parents to let their girls attend classes.

I was lucky to be able to see many activities today – I saw the computer and sewing classes in action, watched an awareness-raising street play on anaemia, a rally by girls against child marriage and I met with one of the life skills class groups. I also did two visits to the homes of beneficiaries, one from the sewing class and one from the life skills group. I was really humbled by the work that is going on – how hard the women leading the project work and their capacity for empathy, but also the enthusiasm and zeal with which the girls engage. I had underestimated the impact that this project is having in transforming the lives of the girls; not only this, but the role that this project is playing in creating a new generation of empowered women in India.


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Feb 16, 2011

Onwards and upwards for Deepali

Deepali at the Imu Breeding Centre
Deepali at the Imu Breeding Centre

Hi all,

I'm sorry that it's been a while since our last update. I'm preparing for my first trip to India with Karuna to actually go and see the projects first-hand. I'm sure that I'll have lots more to share with you when I get back.

In the meantime, here is Deepali's story. You can really see how the project is helping children to build their capacities and confidence:

DEEPALI’S CASE STUDY:

The Last  few weeks have been very busy for Deepali in her studies and programs. 

In the mid-term examinations she worked very hard and obtained good marks, securing   first class.

 Deepali got number of prizes in different programmes.  Pokhari village, as it’s tradition, celebrated a week long program in which Deepali took part in “Dyaneshwari Reading”.  This made her popular in the village and people honoured her by organising a procession for her in their village. 

 In the neighbouring village Sukewadi, a National Child Training Program was organised.  Deepali participated in that program and learnt different songs, plays, stories, participated in the competitions and also won a prize.

 Their Child Parliament also organised a fort building competition.  By making use of broken bricks and soil, Deepali build a beautiful fort and decorated it using different leaves , card board and other material.  In that competition she also got a prize! Not only that, but in the School competition she took part in Kabbadi and Kho-kho ( the local sports) and got the best player award. 

 These prizes not only increased her joy, happiness and confidence but she became popular among villagers, school mates and children.

Their Child Parliament also organised educational picnics at two places, Sugar Factory and the Imu breeding centre. All children educated themselves about process of Sugar production- right from transportation of sugar cane to packaging of sugar cane. 

 In her school Deepali gave a lecture to her school mates  on Personal Hygiene and Hand Washing.  She also informed them about environmental sanitation and the different sickness that occurs due to unhygienic  behaviour. At the birth anniversary of Savitribai Phule, the great social worker in Indian Social Development, Deepali gave speech in her school assembly.  Her speech was well appreciated by her school teachers and peers.

 We can see positive changes in Deepli’s life because she got the opportunity through NISD’S work to grow and develop.

Links:

Dec 20, 2010

Realising the reality of Empowerment

The reality

 I know that I take the level of control that I have over my own life for granted. For me, it’s not the absence of options, but having too much choice that’s often the problem.

I find it difficult to imagine what it must be like to have no choice, to have your future pre-determined in some way.

 Let’s take a look at this:

 Scenario One:

No formal schooling. Low self-esteem. Poor communication skills.

 Likely end result on an individual level:

Married under 18. Domestic violence. Poor health.

 Likely end result on a broader level:

Strengthening of discriminatory values towards women in society. Propelling this cycle for future generations to come.

 This is the cycle that many adolescent girls in Pune’s urban slums find themselves trapped in. Lacking formal competencies and not knowing how to realise their fundamental legal rights, these girls are among the most marginalised in Indian society. The Right to Freedom is longstanding in India, yet this has remained a paper tiger for many of these adolescent girls. It’s not all doom and gloom, though. Through the work of the Women’s Empowerment Project, things are changing.

 Let’s look at this alternative scenario:

 Scenario Two:

Essential life skills. Vocational skills training. Statutory rights awareness. Hygiene and nutrition training.

 Likely end result on an individual level:

Confidence and an appreciation of self-worth. Financial autonomy. Improved long-term health and reduction in maternal and neonatal mortalities due to poor nutrition.

 Likely end result on a broader level:

Positive changes in societal attitudes towards adolescent girls. More girls living with dignity and respect. Improved lives of many young girls who will become the women and mothers of the future.

 The Empowerment Project has already gone a considerable way to making this scenario a reality. Here are just a few ways how it has been doing this:

 Helping others to help themselves

Many of the adolescent girls that this project works with have appeared resigned to the prospects of their not-so-bright futures. It needs to be clear though, that this doesn’t indicate a wilful acceptance of their ‘lot’. On the contrary it has stemmed from a deeply-entrenched sense of fatalism in many cases. This is changing, however.

This project has been empowering girls by successfully equipping them with essential life-skills. Economic empowerment has been a real area of success:

  • A corporation bank has made provisions for the girls to open a saving accounts, allowing for this to happen at zero balance. Many girls are taking advantage of this initiative and experience a sense of pride and security from doing so. 
  •  60 girls visited a bank on an orientation visit and were trained in vital finance management skills.
  • A total of 248 girls have taken part in vocational training in the areas of IT training and/or fashion design and tailoring.  Many girls are now earning their own money and are less dependent on others for their livelihoods.

 And here’s what all this has meant in practice for Shilpa –

 Before I could not even talk in group and used to feel shy to interact with people. I had very low confidence within me but now I feel I have a very bright future. I got confidence that now I can earn money by stitching clothes in my own business, no need of doing domestic work. - Shilpa Jagnaath Pawale, Vishrantwadi

 From ignorance to agency

The maxim that ‘ignorance is bliss’ doesn’t really ring true in this case. In fact, knowledge is often the vital ingredient that can transform the sense of powerlessness experienced at an individual level to one of agency.  Much of the work of the Women’s Empowerment Group has centred on breaking the taboos that are prevalent in conservative and patriarchal Indian society

Helping girls to access information so that they can make informed choices has been crucial, as has their being well-versed in issues directly impeding their health and safety has been crucial:

  • Health awareness initiatives have included training sessions on personal hygiene, healthcare camps related to Cancer awareness and anatomy training. Girls involved now have a greater understanding of changes in their physical well-being and feel more able to respond appropriately.
  • Expert sessions on sexual abuse and self-defence training have been run. There is now an increased feeling of safety among these girls as they are able to respond actively to the threat of violent situations in the home.
  • There has been a lecture on the Domestic Violence prevention Act (2005) and an orientation visit to a local police station. This has meant that these girls are now aware of their legislative rights and are better situated to invoke these protections.

 Here’s a glimpse of the impact that these initiatives are having –

 I attended sex education through which we came to so many things regarding body changes as well as physiological changes during adolescent age. Nowhere we get such information but this project is giving and helping us to cope with the situation. - Komal, Bhimnagar

 All for one and one for all

It is routinely the case that attempts at realising progressive change encounters resistance from key stakeholders. In the case of this particular project, attempts at change have often come up against deeply-entrenched attitudes on perceptions of both caste and gender roles. This makes it all the more important to build and sustain relationships in the broader community that foster understanding and support for the cause. One of the major strengths of this project to date has been the level of harmony and co-operation witnessed between various stakeholders. This impact, although not lending itself to quantification ought not to be underestimated:

  • Previously resistant parents are giving permission for their daughters to participate actively in vocational training workshops and visits to key societal institutions such as police stations.  Having the backing of parents as central stakeholders in the empowerment of girls adds to its perceived acceptability and the overall legitimacy of the project.
  • The project has been enjoying the support of many local community and political groups. For example, the Mahila Mandal and local youth groups have been engaging with the project. It is well-understood that broad local support makes for meaningful community change.
  • 26 teachers from government schools have been trained in the area of girls’ empowerment by experts in the social field. This has led to the increased confidence, capacity and co-operation of local school teachers.

 Looking ahead

 A huge thank you for your generous donations that have been turning the vision of empowered adolescent girls into a reality. In particular we’ve seen donations coming in more and more since our last update, which is just great. I hope that you find this update useful and can share in our joy at the changes taking place on the ground.

 As ever though, a lot of work remains to be done in order to maintain the momentum that has been built up so far. So please continue to give what you can and also to raise awareness about this critical cause.

 If you have any feedback or any specific questions about the project then I would love to hear from you.

 Many thanks again.

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