Nurse-Family Partnership

Nurse-Family Partnership's mission is to empower first-time mothers living in poverty to successfully change their lives and the lives of their children through evidence-based nurse home visiting. The goals of the Nurse-Family Partnership program are: 1. Improve pregnancy outcomes by helping women engage in good preventive health practices, including thorough prenatal care from their healthcare providers, improving their diets, and reducing their use of cigarettes, alcohol and illegal substances; 2. Improve child health and development by helping parents provide responsible and competent care; and 3. Improve the economic self-sufficiency of the family by helping parents develop a vision fo...
Sep 24, 2014

"The Way to Beat Poverty"-Nurse-Family Partnership

Your support of Nurse-Family Partnership is being recognized as helping to beat poverty!

Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn recognized Nurse-Family Partnership® as an effective solution in their column, "The Way to Beat Poverty" in The New York Times column on Sunday, Sept. 14.

They emphasize the power of parenting and intervening early, with evidence-based programs like Nurse-Family Partnership, to break the cycle of poverty.

Nurse-Family Partnership supports first-time moms living in poverty by providing each mom with a registered nurse who provides her with home visits throughout pregnancy until her child’s second birthday.

“The visits have been studied extensively through randomized controlled trials — the gold standard of evidence — and are stunningly effective. Children randomly assigned to nurse visits suffer 79 percent fewer cases of state-verified abuse or neglect than similar children randomly assigned to other programs. Even though the program ends at age 2, the children at age 15 have fewer than half as many arrests on average. At the 15-year follow-up, the mothers themselves have one-third fewer subsequent births and have spent 30 fewer months on welfare than the controls. A RAND Corporation study found that each dollar invested in nurse visits to low-income unmarried mothers produced $5.70 in benefits,” wrote Kristof and WuDunn.

Nurse-Family Partnership, they affirm, “…is an antipoverty program that is cheap, is backed by rigorous evidence and pays for itself several times over in reduced costs later on. Yet it has funds to serve only 2 percent to 3 percent of needy families. That’s infuriating."

They recommend supporting Nurse-Family Partnership to "give at-risk kids a shot at reaching the starting line." 

Thank you for your interest in Nurse-Family Partnership!

Links:

Jul 10, 2014

There are success stories - for sure!

Mela
Mela's NFP nurse, Mela and Mela's baby

We are now about two months past Mother's Day, but since Nurse-Family Partnership believes that every day is Mother's Day we wanted to share with you a Washington Post blog post that was written just before Mother's Day. This story talks about some of NFP's little successes and big successes; like getting the pregnant mom's blood pressure down, having a full-term pregnancy, breastfeeding, bonding with the baby and more!    

“From our visits and her desire to have a better life for herself and her baby, she’s making better choices,” says NFP nurse Gloria.

You can read the entire story at the following link:

The Washington Post

Helping first time moms in need: Nurse-Family Partnership

 

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Your support of Nurse-Family Partnership has helped make both the big and little successes possible for these families and the more than 29,000 other families across the United States – thank you!

Links:

Jul 10, 2014

Nurse-Family Partnership Saves Lives - New Study

One of the unique things about supporting Nurse-Family Partnership is that because of the research behind the program you can be sure that your support really empowers first-time moms to change their lives and the lives of their children.  Just this week, new research is out about one of the initial research trials of Nurse-Family Partnership, read the press release here:

JAMA Pediatrics Reports Nurse-Family Partnership Reduces Preventable
Death Among Mothers and Children

 MEMPHIS, TENN. (July 8, 2014) — A study published by JAMA Pediatrics – a leading, peer-reviewed
journal of the American Medical Association – found that Nurse-Family Partnership® (NFP) reduces
preventable death among both low-income mothers and their first-born children living in disadvantaged,
urban neighborhoods. This is the first randomized, clinical trial of an early intervention program
conducted in a high-income country to find evidence of reductions in maternal and child death.

“Death among mothers and children in these age ranges in the United States general population is rare, but
of enormous consequence. The high rates of death among mothers and children not receiving nurse-home
visits reflect the toxic conditions faced by too many low-income parents and children in our society. The
lower mortality rate found among nurse-visited mothers and children likely reflects the nurses’ support of
mothers’ basic human drives to protect their children and themselves,” said David Olds, Ph.D., professor
of pediatrics at the University of Colorado and lead investigator on the study.

Beginning in 1990, this trial enrolled low-income, primarily African-American mothers living in
disadvantaged neighborhoods in Memphis, Tenn., and assessed maternal and child mortality for over two
decades until 2011. Olds announced today these findings at a press conference held at Le Bonheur
Children’s Hospital, which serves families through NFP in Memphis.

Nurse-Family Partnership produced a significant reduction in preventable child death from birth until age
20. Children in the control group not receiving nurse-home visits had a mortality rate of 1.6% for
preventable causes – including sudden infant death syndrome, unintentional injuries and homicide. There
were zero preventable deaths among nurse-visited children.

In addition, over the same two-decade period, mothers who received nurse-home visits had significantly
lower rates of death for all causes compared to mothers not receiving nurse-home visits. Mothers in the “Death among mothers and children in these age ranges in the United States general population is rare, but
of enormous consequence. The high rates of death among mothers and children not receiving nurse-home
visits reflect the toxic conditions faced by too many low-income parents and children in our society. The
lower mortality rate found among nurse-visited mothers and children likely reflects the nurses’ support of
mothers’ basic human drives to protect their children and themselves,” said David Olds, Ph.D., professor
of pediatrics at the University of Colorado and lead investigator on the study.

Beginning in 1990, this trial enrolled low-income, primarily African-American mothers living in
disadvantaged neighborhoods in Memphis, Tenn., and assessed maternal and child mortality for over two
decades until 2011. Olds announced today these findings at a press conference held at Le Bonheur
Children’s Hospital, which serves families through NFP in Memphis.

Nurse-Family Partnership produced a significant reduction in preventable child death from birth until age
20. Children in the control group not receiving nurse-home visits had a mortality rate of 1.6% for
preventable causes – including sudden infant death syndrome, unintentional injuries and homicide. There
were zero preventable deaths among nurse-visited children.

In addition, over the same two-decade period, mothers who received nurse-home visits had significantly
lower rates of death for all causes compared to mothers not receiving nurse-home visits. Mothers in the control group who did not receive nurse-home visits were nearly three times more likely to die than were
nurse-visited mothers. The relative reduction in maternal mortality was even greater for deaths due to
external causes – those tied to maternal behaviors and environmental conditions – including unintentional
injuries, suicide, drug overdose and homicide. Mothers not receiving nurse-home visits were eight times
more likely to die of these causes than nurse-visited mothers.

“We intend to continue this research to see whether Nurse-Family Partnership reduces premature
mortality at later ages and corresponding health problems as the mothers and children grow older,” said
Olds.

Earlier follow-up studies of the Memphis trial found that nurse-visited mothers, compared to those
assigned to the control group, had better prenatal health and behavior; reduced rates of closely-spaced
subsequent pregnancies; decreased use of welfare, Medicaid and food stamps; fewer behavioral
impairments due to substance use; and fewer parenting attitudes that predispose them to abuse their
children. At earlier phases of follow-up, nurse-visited children,compared to children not receiving nurse-home visits, were less likely to be hospitalized for injuries through age two; less likely to have behavioral problems at school entry; and less likely to reveal depression, anxiety and substance use at age 12.

Your continued support of Nurse-Family Partnership ensures that these results can be realized by thousands of moms and babies across the United States.  

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