Lambi Fund of Haiti

The Lambi Fund's mission is to assist the popular democratic movement in Haiti. The Lambi Fund provides financial resources, training and technical assistance to peasant-led community organizations that promote the social and economic empowerment of the Haitian people.
Sep 10, 2014

A Long Journey Beyond The Crisis

The daily routine for young girls in rural Haiti
The daily routine for young girls in rural Haiti

When 438 farmers,  representing 71 rural peasant organizations, showed up to join the Lambi Fund of Haiti to reflect on the 20 years of partnership, it was a time for celebration. More importantly, it was a time to affirm that change is a long term process and that there is no room to step back.  As the issues emerge, it is clear that our partnership with locally knowledgeable farmers assure that strategic solutions are implemented that make a difference.

2014 is only four years after the devastation of the 2010 earthquake, but having been in Haiti for 20 years, we have learned that from the bottom up, Haitian peasants are making a difference in their local communities, building a stronger economy with the investments we have made together in partnership, investments that allow Haitians to begin to meet their extraordinary potential.

At the same time, the Lambi Fund continues to  work on projects of economic development and sustainable agriculture and environment, contributing to long term rebuilding.  For the northeast, plagued with an 8-month drought that is impacting every life in the three communities in which we are working -  Didyet, Lakoma and Mawotye - each community is getting 10 new cisterns to provide water to 7,500 families. 

This is in addition to the fourteen cisterns built in 2012 each of which provide water for up to 90 families.  It is all adding to the long term rebuilding of Haiti.

Cistern
Cistern
Extremely dry soil due to lack of water
Extremely dry soil due to lack of water

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Aug 11, 2014

Facing the Challenges of Climate and Its Impact on Local Food Production

It is already a complex issue to assure local food production in rural Haiti.  Nearly abandoned to themselves, farmers are collectively working in solidarity to mutually support one another.  Yet their resilience is now seriously challenged with climatic events and unexpected changes.  

Peasants in Gros Morne combatted Sigatoga, a disease that was destroying the plantain - a main staple in Haiti.  With ox-plowing, they mechanized the laboring of the field, increasing the yield as they cultivated more land for planting in time for the rainy season.

Today, these farmers are facing an intensifying problem with clear variation of the climate, the dry season has gotten longer, the expected rain is unpredictable and is shorter.  Farmers, now with mechanized support to expand the acreage plowed, must wait on the rain to seed the ground in areas where there are no rivers.  As river beds dry up, pumping water that has been an ongoing alternative is less than efficient.

Two weeks ago the community of farmers in Gwomon met with the Lambi Fund to dialogue on alternatives and options in the absence of a national plan for watershed management to support local farming.

The efforts must be supported to expand and support local food production.  In this context, the options being considered are as follows:  

                       Advocacy for a long term national plan for watershed management;

                       Building artesian wells that can supply water for planting; 

                       Building cisterns to retain rainwater when it comes in earnest threatening the stabilization of                          the region.

It is evident that we, rural Haiti, cannot confront this problem alone.  It is only the begining of a multi-faceted issue of climate that is intersectorial when it comes to production of food, reduction of poverty and surviving local in a global climate destabilization context.   We need everyone's help to attack an ineffective system that has resulted in reducing our capacity to survive.

Our work in partnership to support local production continues.  Lambi Fund has initiated 6 projects to support local food production:

1. IPTKSK, the Peasant Union in Solidarity with Savann Kare (the Artibonite community in which it is located) formed in 2000 to advance the economic interests of the community.  IPTKSK has proposed an animal husbandry project involving the purchase of 140 female goats and 20 enhanced male goats. This $52,560 project will include technical training on animal breeding and nursery management, and the planting of 20,000 trees.

2. ACHVRO, the peasant association of Ravin Olyann, worked with Lambi Fund in 2011 to acquire a mill to process sugar cane. ACHVRO will acquire a commercial boiler to expand production and to establish a small microcredit fund to expand business opportunities for women in the community. This $19,275 project includes training in business management and accounting.

3. OPB, the Boula Peasant Organization, located in Haiti’s Southern Department, formed 40 years ago to improve the social and economic conditions within their community and to address deforestation. This $33,680 project will enhance agricultural production through the acquisition of four pairs of cows and three ox plows. The project will include planting 20,000 trees and will involve management training and a workshop in nursery management.

4. SOFALA, Active Women in Solidarity with Lafrazilyè, formed in 2005 to improve the condition of women in their community. SOFALA will expand peanut production and plant 20,000 fruit trees. This $31,590 project includes training in orchard maintenance and the harvesting, processing and transportation of fruit to market as well as instruction in organizational management and development.

5. KOFOKA, Active Women of the Commune of Aken, formed in 2008 to improve the social and economic conditions for the women of Komin Aken. Located in the Southern Department of Haiti, Komin Aken has a population of roughly 8,500 people, 350 of whom are members of KOFOKA; ten of its members are men. KOFOKA seeks to reduce wastage, enhance production of fruits and peanuts, and to increase income to their community.

6. CPP, the Center for Plantain Production, was established to work with the farmers of
Gwomon to eradicate Sigatoka, a disease that impacted local plantain production. It began the second phase of development in May, 2014. During the coming year, through a survey of the farmers, the Lambi Fund will seek to identify the needs and define the future role of the CPP. Located in Latibonite, the primary goal in 2014 is to strengthen the organizational capacity of the Center for Plantain Production through reinforcement of its finances while supplying a growing demand for plantain production for other institutions. This should result in the production and sale of a minimum of 30,000 plantain seedlings.

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Links:

Aug 6, 2014

Boula: A Deserving Community of Farmers

Ox-plow at work
Ox-plow at work

The Lambi Fund of Haiti is improving crop productivity in Boula.  When I went to Boula, I saw many farmers working with their hoes turning the soil to prepare it for the planting season, coinciding with the rainy season.  It seemed like an endless journey to get their acreage tilled.  By the end of the day, the dent in the field was barely visible.

Boula sits in the third communal section of Tobek, in the heart of Southern Haiti. 26 men and 24 women had the vision to organize the Organization of the Peasants Of Boula (OPB) in 1975.  Today, they are 230 members strong (94 men and 104 women) taking charge to educate, support, and expand the growth of the community.  They identified their biggest problem as lack of access to ox-plows for the laborers of the land and this resulted in the low harvest thus diminishing the levelof revenue for the farming community.

The Lambi fund will work in partnership with the peasants of Boula to develop the ox-plow service that will serve all farmers in the region. We will provide 4 pairs of oxen and 3 plows. The project will also finance 50 farmers' loans to buy services to expand their cultivated surface to plant for the next harvest.  The organization will also plant 20,000 trees for the replenishment of the environment as part of Lambi's required reforestion aspect.  

In addition OPB will benefit from management training, nursery skills transfer and awareness of the environment.

Project cost :  $33,680.00

Lambi Fund works with a bottom up approach in partenrship with rural farmers in Haiti to assure continued crop productivity, thus supporting food security and reducing poverty in rural Haiti.

Ox
Ox
Land ready to plant in minutes!
Land ready to plant in minutes!

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