Krishi Avam Paristhitiki Vikas Sansthan (KRAPAVIS)

KRAPAVIS is a grass-roots organization concerned chiefly with the community-led revival of village forests, or orans, working in the arid of Thar Desert and semi - arid of Aravali hill bio-regions in Rajasthan. KRAPAVIS mission is clear: the betterment of ecology, agriculture and livestock practices, with a view to the sustainable livelihoods of rural pastoral communities in Rajasthan.
Feb 18, 2015

Community Actions' Mitigates Climate Change

Community members planting trees on grazing lands
Community members planting trees on grazing lands

Rajasthan, the project area, is the driest state in India. In the west of the state lies the Thar Desert, the most densely populated desert region on Earth. The occurrence of drought in this region is frequent but highly unpredictable, and consequently the conservation of water resources and reliable grazing lands is of the utmost importance. In recent years, population increase and the shift towards modern agricultural techniques, have led to the increased vulnerability of rural communities. Moreover, in a region as susceptible to drought as this, the climatic irregularities brought about by climate change have been felt acutely. Recognizing this, the project 'stop deforestation and restore grazing lands' has sought.

The project increases the resilience and adaptive capacity of communities, through interventions e.g. rehabilitating water harvesting structures, installing conservation devices and protecting trees, raising saplings in nurseries & transplantation including grass growing on the Orans or grazing lands, in the 10 project villages. In order to share and replicate the communities’ experiences, a workshop was organized, on 17th January 2015. As many as 40 people, including project community leaders, representatives of universities, government, research, academic institutions and NGOs were participated. As a result, this workshop has contributed to a growing body of information about community-level concerns, observations and experiences relating to climate change impacts and adaptation. Also, it strengthened the link between knowledge centres, universities, research and academic institutions and NGOs and communities in such a way that all can benefit on the issue of climate change and adoption.

communities
communities' experience sharing on climate change

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Nov 28, 2014

A profound, moving and educational experience

Planing and training session with pastoralists
Planing and training session with pastoralists

The project undertaken conservation of ‘Orans’ community forest and grazing land; activities includes building rainwater harvesting structures, trees plantation, community skill development training and so on. A group of 13 leaders from different countries, made a two days (3-4 Nov. 2014) visit to the project. And, their quest was:

  • What do we want humanity to be?
  • What really matters in life?
  • What is our personal role in helping to enable the world to be a better place?
  • What do we need to shift in ourselves internally before we can effectively engage as leaders of change externally?

After visiting the project, their experiences read as, “Dear Amanji, Back in rainy UK after a wonderful end to the Pow Wow in Rajasthan, I wanted to write to thank you wholeheartedly for being such a wonderful host to our group who came to spend time with you, the community and the Oran at Bera. The group were all moved in different ways – by your passion, bravery and humility over the years, by the relaxed generosity with which we were greeted in the village, by the walk to the Oran.   Realising that a tiger had crossed our path that very morning was a delight and the visit to the Mahatma was rich indeed - his humour, wisdom and irreverence a delightful and thought provoking mix!! Thank you for taking such care with all the details of organisation.  This was a profound, moving and educational experience for us all which will never be forgotten------.” Nigel Topping, Facilitator of the Leaders’ Quest, as write through e-mail.

World leaders interact with project community
World leaders interact with project community

Links:

Aug 26, 2014

Listening to the Sounds of the Forest

My guides as we walk through a restored land
My guides as we walk through a restored land

The following is a postcard from Neeharika Tummala, GlobalGiving's In-the-Field Representative in India and Bangladesh, about her recent visit to Krishi Avam Paristhitiki Vikas Sansthan (KRAPAVIS).

Of the 50 odd organizations I have visited, KRAPAVIS has a unique mandate of community development. They closely understand the relationship of people to the environment and how preserving one can benefit the other. Like millions of people in rural India, people are dependent on agriculture and raising cattle. But with lack of understanding and neglect, several grazing lands are being eroded and spoilt. As a result, birds don’t nest there, animals leave and biodiversity decreases. KRAPAVIS showed me that the damage is not permanent and with effort, grazing lands can be restored. I visited several such restored sites and my guides were two local KRAPAVIS ladies who have now become informal biodiversity experts! They showed me the nursery, where new plants are grown and then sold at nominal prices, taught me the names of certain plants and even showed me how to protect ants. No species is ignored! In one of the restored areas, I was told that tigers come at night to drink water, something that did not happen before and a great sign of conservation success. Conservation includes things like building bunds so that rainwater is conserved and available for community use.

The founder Aman would walk me through a site and would say ‘can you hear that?’ and I would say ‘what?’ and he said ‘the sound of birds chirping!’ I took these sounds for granted but realized what a disturbing world it would be if I woke up to hear silence instead of birds in the air.

The impact of restoring these grazing lands is that cattle have food and access to water which provides herders with increased access to milk and therefore income. One of the best examples of sustainable development that I have seen!   

The Nursery
The Nursery
Protecting the Ants
Protecting the Ants
A community member who stops to say hi
A community member who stops to say hi
Walking on one of the rainwater harvesting bunds
Walking on one of the rainwater harvesting bunds
Women collecting water for cooking and drinking
Women collecting water for cooking and drinking

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