DEPDC

DEPDC is a non-governmental, non-profit community-based organization that provides education and full-time accommodation to children in prevention and protection of being trafficked into the commercial sex industry and other exploitative labor conditions.
Dec 15, 2014

HDS's School Garden

Preparing the ground for sowing!
Preparing the ground for sowing!

The midyear break passed by and school restarted in November. The Half Day School's (HDS) Lunch Program (LP) also restarted to provide a healthy and nutritious meal for all of the students who may not be able to receive such meals at home.

Many students are not able to have a proper breakfast in the morning, and some come to school without having eaten breakfast at all. A Student complaining that he or she is hungry in the late morning is common, and they are really looking forward for their first meal of the day. Lunch is served at two different times. It is served at 11:30 for the younger students and at noon for the older students.

The LP costs approximately 10$ per student per month to pay for lunch throughout the school month. Additionally, the LP provides the students with fresh fruits and snacks during the afternoon.

HDS has its own school garden to grow vegetables and fruits on the school compound to cut the costs for vegetables and fruits. All farming done in the school's garden is following organic farming principles to provide high quality vegetables. The fields are mainly maintained by the teachers of HDS, but are also used to give the children the chance to have a small patch of land for themselves where they can grow whatever they like. Teacher Pawina teaches the students how to grow vegetables. She instructs them how to sow, manure, control pests, and how to harvest their vegetables.

At the moment, teachers and students of HDS are growing banana, papaya, corn, water spinach, garlic, yardlong beans, kale, cucumber, climbing wattle, peas, chili peppers, gac fruits, and tomatoes.

Knowledge about growing vegetables and fruits is a valuable skill for the children. They can use their knowledge to supplement the diet of their family by growing crops in their own gardens and pass their agricultural knowledge forward to relatives and friends. The usage of organic farming principles reduces cost by replacing chemical pesticides and fertilizers by natural ones.

We would like to thank everybody for their help and generosity given, thus allowing the Lunch Program to provide all of our students with at least one proper meal a day. The money donated insures the permanent provision of a nutritious meal to our students and enables them to learn new skills for their future.

Watering the garden!
Watering the garden!
Harvesting Pak Gaad!
Harvesting Pak Gaad!

Links:

Oct 31, 2014

Spotlight on Ms. Puangthong Takan (P' Too)

P
P'Too (most right) during life skills training!

Spotlight on Ms. Puangthong Takan (P' Too), Director and the woman who does it all

 

Since our last report three months ago, the monsoon season passed by, and the cold season is approaching. The girls at the Chiang Khong Shelter finished their term and are on their mid-year holiday right now. In the case that staying at their parents' home is safe, the girls will use this chance to stay with their families for the duration of the holidays.

As it is safe for most girls to stay with their families during this period one might think this could also be a time to relax for P' Too, our director at the Chiang Khong Shelter, but for her only the tasks change. She is not only the director of the shelter but also engaged in various other activities related to child protection.

As our project has a long history in Chiang Khong it is very well connected with other organizations, like NGOs, GOs, private businesses, and local communities. This makes our shelter also to a point of contact for emergency cases that need immediate action to be taken. Taking care of these emergency cases is one of the important tasks that P'Too manages alongside her work as director and caregiver at our Chiang Khong Shelter.

In the short period of the last three months, P'Too has had to take care of seven of these emergency cases. Four girls and three boys came into the situation that they had to be placed into a shelter immediately.

The last case concerned a 9-year-old girl from a village close to Chiang Khong whom lived together with only her farther. Her aunt contacted the shelter at Chiang Khong. She was worried about the safety of her niece, because her father is an alcoholic and was neglectful toward his daughter most of the time. She was often forced to stay home from school, because she had to take care of her farther and his friends while they were inebriated.

P'Too was finally able to receive permission to get the girl out of this situation and successfully placed the girl into our Chiang Khong Shelter for a few days until a long-term solution was found at a shelter in Chiang Rai.

In addition to the direct work with children, P'Too is very active in the field of monitoring the situation and development of human trafficking.

We would like to thank everybody for their help and generosity given, thus allowing the Chiang Khong Shelter to provide safety and education to the girls living there. The money donated insures the shelter’s continuing long-term impact on the lives and the chances in the future of these special young women.

Life skills training at the Chiang Khong Shelter!
Life skills training at the Chiang Khong Shelter!
P
P'Too during a workshop!

Links:

Oct 21, 2014

New Teacher and Interview with Seoul and Tommy!

Left to Right: Tommy, CLC teacher Channing, Seoul
Left to Right: Tommy, CLC teacher Channing, Seoul

DEPDC/GMS would like to formally thank all of their supporters and wish to express the hope for continued support as we try to make a difference in the lives of children and the community!

In the past three months, the International Department, which is responsible for Community Learning Center’s (CLC) English as a Foreign Language class (EFL) has seen a turnover in volunteers. A relatively new volunteer has taken over all three CLC EFL classes since the last report was turned in. Over the past three months, Thai schools have had final exams and have begun a one-month vacation period.
The new volunteer is a native from the United States and has created a curriculum that revolves around three main aspects of the English language: pronunciation, creative writing, and grammar. She also takes into consideration the interests of her students, so with 15 minutes to spare at the end of every lesson, she hosts a culture-themed question and answer session. Topics that have been brought up include the difference between British English and American English, life at university, and questions about popular books and movies. The new volunteer will continue her commitment to CLC EFL until the end of her volunteer period. She will continue with her curriculum, and as many holidays on the horizon, looks forward to doing holiday-themed activities (i.e. Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years).
Due to exams and vacations, attendance is greatly varied. During normal school time, the class averages about five students per class, and during exam-time and breaks, the class averages about two students per class. The general English-level of the class is pre-intermediate.

Interview with Seoul and Tommy:

What are your goals pertaining to learning English? Why do you want to learn English?

Seoul:
“I would like to learn to speak English well. I want to learn English so I can travel and meet a lot of people and have foreign friends. I also want learn English so I have more range in job options and can get better jobs.”

Tommy:
“I want to learn English so I can find a job that requires me to speak English well. I would like to study abroad in America and travel around there, too. I want to make friends who speak English.”

What is your favorite part of CLC?

Seoul:
“I like the volunteer teachers. They are very nice and friendly. I like practicing my conversational skills with the teachers. I also like learning more about foreign cultures.”

Tommy:
“I like getting to spend time with volunteer teachers. The teachers are nice and good at teaching. I like getting to meet all of the new volunteers and making friends with foreign people.”

How do you think learning English will help you with your future?

Seoul:
“Many people speak English. English is the second language to learn, because it is most people’s second language. Learning a second language makes you more open-minded and culturally aware. Being closed-minded harms your ability to participate in a [globalized world].”

Tommy:
“English is the only language in the world foreigners speak to other foreigners (Interviewer: I informed him that is not necessarily always the case). Speaking an international language is the best way to lead an international lifestyle!”

As always, our volunteer, Channing, welcomes suggestions on what could make her class better, more effective, and more fun! Please feel free to email her directly.

Links:

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