American Diabetes Association - Oregon

To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.
Jun 30, 2015

Diabetes Statistics

2014 InfoGraphic
2014 InfoGraphic

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes is a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors appear to play roles.

  • Type 1. An autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce any insulin, most often occurring in children and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to stay alive.
  • Type 2. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to make enough or properly use insulin. This form of the disease is associated with older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, prior history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity.
  • Gestational diabetes. Immediately after pregnancy, 5-10% of women with gestational diabetes are found to have type 2 diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35-60% chance of developing diabetes in the next 10-20 years.

Diabetes Statistics

  • 29.1 million: The estimated number of children and adults in the United States who have diabetes; Over 400,000 in Oregon.
  • 86 million: The estimated number of Americans who have prediabetes; Over 1 million in Oregon.
  • 1.7 million: The number of new cases of diabetes diagnosed in people aged 20 years or older in 2010.
  • 13.4 million: The number of women in the United States who have diabetes.
  • 12.8%: The percent of Hispanic/Latino Americans who have diabetes.
  • 13.2%: The percent of African Americans who have diabetes.
  • 69,071: The number of annual deaths due to diabetes in the United States according to death certificate reports from 2010 for a total of 234,051 deaths in which diabetes is a primary or contributing factor.
  • If current trends continue, one in three American adults will have diabetes by 2050.
  • Every 19 seconds one person is diagnosed with diabetes.
  • Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure, non-traumatic lower-limb amputation, and new cases of blindness among adults in the United States.
  • Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease and stroke.
  • Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death by disease in the United States.

Cost of Diabetes

  • The American Diabetes Association estimates that the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $245 billion, $4 billion in Oregon.

o   Direct medical costs reach $176 billion, and the average medical expenditure among people with diabetes is 2.3 times higher than those without the disease.

o   Indirect costs amount to $69 billion (disability, work loss, premature mortality).

  • One out of every ten health care dollars is spent on diabetes. One out of every five health care dollars is spent on a person living with diabetes.

American Diabetes Association

  • The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to stop diabetes and its deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes.
  • The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes.
  • Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.
  • Over the years, the American Diabetes Association has invested more than $500 million in diabetes research and provided funding for more than 4,000 research projects.
  • For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit www.diabetes.org. Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish.

Links:

Jun 30, 2015

Meet Chris Hoy - Tour de Cure Red Rider

Chris, Red Rider at Tour de Cure
Chris, Red Rider at Tour de Cure

The purpose of the Red Rider program is to support everyone who lives with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and showcase the courage it takes to live every day with this difficult disease. It's time to celebrate those with diabetes who get on their bikes and ride! The Tour de Cure recognizes riders with diabetes as the heroes on the day of the event! 

Being a Red Rider means...
That you are not alone.  With hundreds of riders who may share a similar story, and hundreds more to support you, being a Red Rider can help with your first step or your millionth- in your fight to live a healthier life!

We are thrilled to highlight Red Rider, Chris. Chris and all our Red Riders remind us why all of our hard work with fundraising is so important.  Every dollar raised helps us get that much closer to our mission; to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.  The funds raised through Tour de Cure support advocacy, research and education efforts in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

MEET CHRIS!

"I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 20 years ago.  Diabetes impacts so many of us in such a negative way.  If I had known how to prevent it a long time ago, I might not have lost my mother when she was just 53 years old and I might not have it myself.  I'm proud today to be able to say I've almost completely reversed my diabetes - but I'm not there yet.  I've taken up cycling as my primary exercise.  I started riding my bike 3 miles around my neighborhood.  Two years later, in 2014, I rode my first century (100 miles) in Tour de Cure.  And this year I am riding in my third Tour de Cure.  Last year I rode my bike over 7,000 miles - every one of them was another milestone in taking back my health.

I started this journey in July 2011, weighing 434 pounds.  Today I've lost 175 pounds and am well on my way to recapturing my health.  The key for me has been to track every single thing I eat by using the application MyFitnessPal.  This keeps me conscious and aware of every calorie before I consume it.  Personal accountability keeps me motivated and on track.

I always thought it was too late, but it's definitely not!  It's never too late.  I encourage everyone to start where they are and build from there.  Eat less - move more.  Simple, but definitely not easy." - Chris, Red Rider

Chris- Before
Chris- Before
Chris - After
Chris - After

Links:

Apr 1, 2015

Meet Betsy- A Tour de Cure Red Rider

Betsy Hartley
Betsy Hartley

The purpose of the Red Rider program is to support everyone who lives with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and showcase the courage it takes to live every day with this difficult disease. It's time to celebrate those with diabetes who get on their bikes and ride! The Tour de Cure recognizes riders with diabetes as the heroes on the day of the event! 

Being a Red Rider means...
That you are not alone.  With hundreds of riders who may share a similar story, and hundreds more to support you, being a Red Rider can help with your first step or your millionth- in your fight to live a healthier life!

We are thrilled to highlight Red Rider, Betsy.  Betsy and all our Red Riders remind us why all of our hard work with fundraising is so important.  Every dollar raised helps us get that much closer to our mission; to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.  The funds raised through Tour de Cure support advocacy, research and education efforts in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

MEET BETSY!
"Why I ride?!

I weighed 392 at my heaviest. I was a Type 2 Diabetic taking 3 shots a day and a handful of other prescriptions meds. This went on for almost 10 years. 

July of 2011 I decided I was done. I was ready to do whatever I had to do to change. I was ready to LIVE. And be healthy. 

I am now 46, weigh 165 and I am no longer a Type 2 diabetic.  I started this whole process of changing my lifestyle to see if I could REALLY reverse Type 2 diabetes.I no longer just wanted to survive with something that I was being told I had the chance to reverse. And I had to try to reverse it since I hadn't paid attention over the years when they warned me to change my ways... 

We with T2 have at least a shot at trying to reverse the disease. 

I started eating less, eating healthier and moving more. That's it. That's what I have done to the best of my ability the last 1,200+ days. It's been a lot of hard work, but so, so, so worth it!

I am PROUD to ride and raise money for this great organization and for my 3rd Tour de Cure for several reasons

  1. It's a fun event on a beautiful course!  Well run, safe, family-friendly, super volunteers -- it's a great riding event for anyone of ANY level.  
  2. I relied heavily on American Diabetes Association resources when I was first diagnosed and I want to make SURE that those resources are available for others who need the help.  
  3. This hard-working organization also works to fund and find a cure for Type 1 diabetes AND they have a great program to make sure children with Type 1 in schools have trained providers who can help with diabetes care when they aren't with their families.  
  4. Who doesn't love a great day, in the sun, with friends, on their bike?!

    Come on!  Join me at Tour de Cure on July 25!  It's fun for everyone of all ages and riding abilities!"
    - Betsy

Thank you for your support of Tour de Cure. 

Betsy Hartley
Betsy Hartley

Links:

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