Women for Women International

In countries affected by conflict and war, Women for Women International supports the most marginalized women to earn and save money, improve health and well-being, influence decisions in their home and community, and connect to networks for support. By utilizing skills, knowledge, and resources, she is able to create sustainable change for herself, her family, and community.
Oct 15, 2012

Meet Azada - A Success Story

A group of students in a stone polishing class.
A group of students in a stone polishing class.

Meet Azada, a graduate of WfWI. During her year-long holistic training program with WfWI, Azada learned how to cut gem stones to make jewlery, allowing her to find a job after graduation so she could support her family. Learning a vocational school and being able to support herself and her family has provided her with a massive sense of accomplishment. Go Azada!

Azada was 14 when her father asked her to marry a cousin of hers; hoping, as is common in some forms of Islam, that a relative would treat her better than a stranger. It wasn’t the case.

Azada had two daughters with her husband, and wondered how she’d ever be able to escape his abuse. Finally her father agreed she should divorce, and she lived with him in Pakistan, performing difficult and low-paying labor to survive, until the Taliban fell in 2001.

Upon her return to Kabul with her family, Azada enrolled in Women for Women International’s sponsorship program and learned to cut semi-precious stones for jewelry. Now she teaches other women the skills she acquired with Women for Women International. Her most prized possession is her certificate of employment. “I never thought that I would have the opportunity to support myself without a man,” Azada says. “Now... I am doing it!”

Oct 11, 2012

Meet WfWI Graduate Pashton

Pashton at work
Pashton at work

Meet Pashton, a graduate of WfWI. During her year-long holistic training program with WfWI, Pashton learned new tailoring skills, allowing her to find a job after graduation so she could support her family.

Pashton is a 35 year old widow who lost her husband in the war. She is now the single mother of six children; three sons and three daughters. Before Pashton was busy as a tailor but experienced countless economic difficulties. Pashton was introduced to the Woman for Women office and now feels happy because she is once again an active woman in the community.

Pashton is working with the Safi Apparel Corporation and is discovering new tailoring skills. Pashton is very intelligent and a diligent worker. She is so thankful for Women for Women International. Pashton says "I had many difficulties and now by the grace of Allah have few. I am taking my 75 dollar salary from Safi Apparel Corporation in the merciful Allah because now my life condition is better then previous."

She is able to send her six children to school and is so grateful to WWI for providing her with this unprecedented opportunity of working at the Safi Apparel Corporation.

Oct 11, 2012

Meet WfWI Graduate Nabintu

Meet WfWI - DRC graduate Nabintu. Learn how she has transformed her life after participating in WfWI's year-long holistic training program, which includes basic numeracy and literacy skills, health education, rights awareness training, business skill training and vocational skills training in a specific vocational track. 

Nabintu's life was completely changed by the war and violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Married to a husband she loved and raising their three children, Nabintu was happy with her life, despite the conflict going on in their country. One night, while her husband was away, a group of men who were part of the Interahamwe broke into her house, and two of the men raped Nabintu. They kidnapped her and five other women from her village, leaving her children behind alone. For days, the women were forced to walk, not knowing where they were headed. One woman who complained that she was tired was shot and killed by the men.

After arriving in a strange village, Nabintu was traded away to another man for 12 charges of bullets and a box of beer. For three months, the man held Nabintu as a prisoner and used her for sex anytime he wanted. Upon hearing that other people in his village wanted to kill Nabintu, however, he helped her escape to Bukavu. Once free, Nabintu tried to return to her husband, but he said he could no longer live with her because she was considered the wife of the Interahamwe and was carrying her captor's child.

Nabintu went to live with her mother and her three other children, but food was scarce, and Nabintu was forced to carry heavy loads while pregnant, earning less than a dollar a day. A few years after the birth of her fourth child, Nabintu heard about an organization that helps socially-excluded women like herself, and decided to join Women for Women International's year-long program. Learning vocational and business skills allowed her to start her own small business making popular local drinks; with the help of her sponsor, she saved $15 each month to reinvest in her business. Most importantly, Nabintu learned to value herself and to consider herself a person equal to others.

The encouragement she received from Women for Women International's staff and the women in her group helped her overcome her past abuse and look toward her future.

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $50
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $250
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $250
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Women for Women International

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Women for Women International on GreatNonProfits.org.