Puntacana Ecological Foundation

To protect and restore the natural resources of the Punta Cana region and contribute to the sustainable development of the Dominican Republic
Sep 23, 2014

September 18, 2014 Report

Successful execution of the wastewater treatment
Successful execution of the wastewater treatment

As we stated in our last report The Puntacana Ecological Foundation and the rest of the Fuentes de Vida coalition are proud to announce the successful execution of the wastewater treatment portion of the FDV project. This has solidified three years of planning and trust building with the community of Domingo Maíz. Having seen the ability of the FDV coalition to produce results, the residents are now eagerly pushing for an effective solution to another basic need: access to safe potable water.

Since applying for funding from last year the Fuentes de Vida (FDV) Coalition has successfully constructed the province’s first community-scale wastewater treatment system in the community of Domingo Maíz. Throughout the approximately six month construction of the wastewater treatment system, the community of Domingo Maíz exceeded expectations adapting to an intensive and disruptive public works project in the heart of their community. The residents of Domingo Maíz living in the treatment area report several immediately noticeable benefits of the constructed wetlands system, namely the absence of effluent water pooling in public areas and a significant reduction in foul odors.

Sustained education/awareness on the importance of wastewater treatment, a complex topic to discuss even in the most developed communities, will continue as the principal long term initiative of FDV.  During a recent community wide meeting the vast majority of community members demonstrated that they fully grasp the method of FDV – first treat the sources of contamination and then deliver safe potable water – and continued to support the project’s methodology. The community meeting also produced a strong push from the residents to advance with the potable water phase of the project.

Currently there are approximately 12 private wells providing water to the residents of Domingo Maíz. Water is pumped up from the ground into large tanks on the roof of the well owner’s house. Many problems currently arise from this system not least of which are: a lack of consistent chlorination, preferential/non-transparent pricing and a lack of water if the owner is absent for any stretch of time and thus not able to fill the tanks. While well water is not typically used for drinking, the residents of Domingo Maíz depend on this water for a myriad of activities which can still result in water borne illnesses such as cleaning and preparing foods, washing dishes, washing clothes, and bathing.

The principal objective of the potable water phase of the Fuentes de Vida project is to implement a centralized aqueduct system which will allow for more consistent water supply, greater community oversight and more consistent/transparent chlorination procedures. In order to achieve these desired outcomes the community of Domingo Maíz is currently forming the Water Committee, whose principal function will be to implement and execute the monthly quota system in order to provide the necessary start up funding and cover the subsequent operational costs of both the potable and wastewater systems. In addition the committee will oversee the operation of the potable water system including: regular maintenance, chlorination, closing off connections for those residents who do not pay their quotas, etc. the committee consists of a president, secretary, treasurer and a plumber. The Neighborhood Association of Domingo Maíz will appoint each member of the Water Committee for a term of one year.

The potable water phase of the Fuentes de Vida project involves several ambitious objectives both in terms of community organization as well as system functionality. As for this Global Giving page we ask that any and all potential donors continue to consider this project for their donations as we still need your help in raising the necessary funds for the potable water.

Domingo Maiz community leaders
Domingo Maiz community leaders
Sep 5, 2014

September 3, 2014 Report

2014 has been a great year for the Ridgway’s Hawk. In our last report we mentioned that we increased our release efforts and brought 29 new hawks to PuntaCana. All of these individuals were able to be released at the hacksite in PuntaCana and with a lot of hard work, all fledged successfully. The last of the released hawks (currently six individuals continue to eat at the hacksite) are still returning to the hacksite to eat, but as the remaining hawks become independent and begin to hunt for themselves, they will stop returning to eat the food we have been providing. This year we released our first group of hawks on April 9th and it wasn’t until the first week in June till we released the final group. The large group of individuals released has made this the longest hacking period that the project has ever had. In all, we have been at the release site every morning and every evening for close to 5 months and have purchased close to US $4000.00 in food (mostly laboratory raised rats) to feed the hawks.

A big part of our work is tracking and monitoring the birds when they are not at the release site. This is very important as it gives us the opportunity to further insure the success of each individual after they have become independent. These tracking expeditions often become educational excursions as we tell the story of the hawk and the conservation project to tourists, local farmers, security guards and anyone else we encounter. One of the biggest issues facing Ridgway’s Hawks in the Dominican Republic is persecution by humans. This is normally done by subsistence farmers who are accustomed to killing hawks to protect their chickens rather than protecting them with chicken coops. One person at a time, we are educating these farmers about the importance of the hawks and the work we are doing. We have even begun to provide chicken coops to some of these individuals and they really like to use them as it protects their valuable chickens from other predators as well. We also educate them about all the benefits that raptors provide to farmers in controlling agricultural pests such as mice and rats. The cooperation from these individuals is encouraging.

Another part of this monitoring is to learn what causes of mortality our released hawks may be facing. In nature it is normal for some individuals to parish in the process of reaching adult hood. In raptor populations in general, it is thought that between 70-80% of nestlings born in the wild will die during their first year. As mentioned before, persecution is one of the major causes of mortality for Ridgway’s Hawks and normally predation by other animals is also a big concern for nestling and fledgling raptors. In Ridgway’s, we have documented very low mortality rates due to predation, but have discovered a larger concern, electrocution on power lines. Fortunately for Ridgway’s Hawks in the PuntaCana area, Grupo PuntaCana continues to work on this issue. The PuntaCana Ecological Foundation and Grupo PuntaCana have already been working on these power lines for some time now since our first documented case of electrocution in 2011. In 2014, we brought in an expert in raptor electrocutions to review the power lines in the release area. During the 2014-2015 season, the power lines in PuntaCana will be undergoing a complete retrofitting. This will be done using specially designed products to insulate the energized wires on each pole. Retrofitting power lines is costly and the first phase of the project is expected to cost close to US $20,000.00.

While the 2014 release season is still going, preparations are underway for the following nesting season in LHNP and to release another group of approximately 25 hawks in Punta Cana. Dominican field technicians, Valentine Cespedez and Misael Calcano are tracking the hawks daily and bring encouraging reports that some of the newly released hawks have been consistently seen with B-44, the male hawk who hatched in the wild in PuntaCana in 2013. We have high expectations that we will be seeing more pairs of Ridgway’s Hawks in the Punta Cana area in 2015 and with this more hope for one of the most critically endangered raptors in the world.

Jun 25, 2014

May 31, 2014 Report

Volunteer service day with the Community
Volunteer service day with the Community

The Puntacana Ecological Foundation and the rest of the Fuentes de Vida coalition are proud to announce that the constructed wetlands wastewater treatment system has been completed!

Throughout the month of March 2014, most of the work focused on excavating the wetlands area of the system. When excavation began in February a 16-inch wide Vermeer trencher was first brought in to do the work, however, after several breakdowns and delays this was then replaced by a 30-inch wide trencher although breakdowns and delays continued due to the dense limestone substrate. Finally, the excavation of the wetlands was completed during the last week of March with a 2.4 meter wide “Tambor” trencher. On March 19th, volunteers from the NGO Positive Legacy (the same group that also awarded the project over USD$26,000) realized a day of service in the community in which they helped prepare the wire frames of the septic tanks and also continued painting the community park’s mural. With the wire frames ready to be assembled, skilled masons began constructing the septic tanks on March 25th and completed their work on April 1st. On March 19th, the Response Peace Corps volunteer who had been overseeing the project returned to the United States having already trained a local Dominican engineer to take his place as the project’s lead engineer.

Excavation of the main sewer lines began on April 1st and was completed on April 14th with a 60 cm wide Vermeer trencher. In total, 322.05 linear meters (231.88 m3) were excavated for the main sewer lines. The geotextile liner was installed on April 7th and 8th on the bottom of the constructed wetlands to prevent any leakage in the wetlands treatment area. After the liner was installed the wetlands area was filled back in with gravel measuring ¾ of an inch and 1 ½ inches (in total 197 m3 of ¾ inch gravel and 36 m3 of 1 ½ inch gravel were installed in the wetlands). Due to equipment constraints, filling in the wetlands with the gravel had to be done manually, with wheel barrels and shovels, thus this portion of the project lasted approximately two weeks. Simultaneously, workers from the community installed the main sewer lines and refilled the trenches with the material the trencher had removed.

The month of May 2014 was primarily dedicated to excavating the ancillary services lines with jackhammers and connecting the bathrooms to the system. Community members were responsible for paying for the necessary labor to connect their toilets to the system, which most residents did. On May 16th a new Peace Corps volunteer arrived in Domingo Maiz to work with the community on the system’s oversight and maintenance as well as the implementation of the monthly quota, which each household is supposed to pay. By the end of May almost all of the houses in the community were connected to the system and wastewater began flowing through the treatment system. On May 21st a group of Civil & Environmental engineers from the University of Virginia Tech arrived to carry out their annual community well water sampling, however, this year’s program also included a complete review of the system including initial water testing to quantify the system’s efficacy even without the plants.

Finally on Saturday, June 14th, the community members of Domingo Maiz and volunteers from other organizations/communities all participated in planting the plants in the wetlands, symbolically and literally marking the end of the construction of the Fuentes de Vida wastewater treatment system.

Moving forward the Ecological Foundation along with its project partners in the Fuentes de Vida coalition will work with the neighborhood association of Domingo Maiz to ensure the system is operating correctly while simultaneously beginning preparations for the implementation of the potable water system in the community.


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