Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Jan 26, 2015

Saving a Rainforest

Saplings moved from the nursery to shade nets
Saplings moved from the nursery to shade nets

Deforestation threatens thousands of species and has devastating consequences for humans. Forest loss jeopardizes human food and water security, threatens plants and animals with extinction, and contributes to climate change, putting communities and wildlife at increased risk of floods, droughts, infectious disease, and other natural disasters.

Wildlife Alliance’s Tropical Reforestation Project combats the impact of illegal logging and slash-and-burn farming practices while providing jobs to local residents. Eighty-two workers, primarily women, work in our tree nursery and care for the saplings year-round.

To date, Wildlife Alliance has replanted more than 733,000 trees in this region. In Cambodia, the winter months are the dry season, and not much planting happens in the fields. The Reforestation teams work on maintaining existing fields and growing seedlings in the nursery. From October to December of last year, the project worked to maintain over 595 hectares of planted forest. This is no easy feat; they spend long days in the sun enriching the soil, growing fibrous grass to prevent erosion, removing weeds, and replacing damaged saplings. In the nursery, the teams peeled and sowed seeds, transfered over 40,000 seedlings from the greenhouse to the shade net, and collected over 262 kgs of indigenous seeds.

Thank you for supporting this vital project, your gift is helping us restore the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range!

Maintaining Reforested Land
Maintaining Reforested Land
Jan 12, 2015

Highlights From End of 2014

In just 3 months, KE reached 1,376 students
In just 3 months, KE reached 1,376 students

It has been a tremendously successful year for the Kouprey Express Mobile Environmental Project (KE) team, and the last three months have been exceptionally busy. The new school year for students in Cambodia started in November and since then, KE has been bustling from town to town, providing conservation lessons to 1,376 students and 309 community members, as well as training to 80 teachers in the area.

In October, for the first time ever, KE travelled to the islands off of Sihanoukville to give wildlife and marine life education lessons at the invitation of Save Cambodian Marine Life, a local NGO.  This was also the first time KE has included marine education in its curriculum. The team instructed 40 students and 22 community members from Friends of Koh Rong, 42 students and 25 community members at Rong Salem Community Pre-Primary School and 69 students and 12 community members through the Song Saa Foundation. All the participants were engaged in the education sessions, especially the students and community members at Friends of Koh Rong, who had never experienced these types of lessons or activities before!

In November, KE was invited by the Peace Corps in Svay Rieng province to provide wildlife and forest conservation lessons to 270 high school students from grades 10-12 at Romeas Hek high school. These students were particularly interested and asked many questions about endangered wildlife and deforestation. Because of their interest, the team pushed the students and made the lessons and activities a bit harder than usual. After the academic component, the team wrapped up the class with artwork and a few games. This session went really well, and the team got great feedback from the Peace Corps on these lessons.

In December, KE provided a teacher training session to 20 teachers from Stoeng Samraong and Prey Praseth Primary School in Sihanoukville. The training was focused on Weather, Water and Sanitation, Waste and Sanitation, Energy, Biodiversity and Sustainable Livelihoods. The team trained the teachers on the environmental concepts, how to deliver this knowledge to students, and various interactive games that better engage students. These training sessions are extremely important in providing new material and knowledge to teachers in remote areas that lack access to these kinds of opportunities.

Other activities performed during this period include installing anti-wildlife trafficking signs with students, planting trees near schools, and conducting wildlife and forest protection themed Night Shows to remote communities.

We would like to thank everyone who has so generously contributed towards Empowering Students and Communities to Become Environmental Stewards. Your support is greatly appreciated and allows us to continue to bring about lasting environmental change in Cambodia.

Interative lessons with take-home material
Interative lessons with take-home material
Provided material and training to 80 teachers
Provided material and training to 80 teachers
Putting up anti-wildlife trafficking signs
Putting up anti-wildlife trafficking signs
Dec 29, 2014

Forest Rangers Rescue Leopard Cat Kitten

Leopard cat kitten safe after rescue
Leopard cat kitten safe after rescue

Last month, the Trapeang Rung Patrol Unit received information from an informant about the trafficking of a leopard cat kitten. The traders were seen leaving Koh Kong Town in a Toyota Camry with the kitten and were heading towards Phnom Penh. The rangers left immediately to intercept the vehicle at a nearby checkpoint on Highway 48. After several cars were cleared, the Camry finally pulled up and a thorough search of the vehicle was conducted. Unfortunately, no wildlife was found and the suspect was free to go. Realizing the trader must have disposed of the kitten when he saw the rangers at the checkpoint, the team decided to spread out and search for the animal. After several hours, the rangers found the poor kitten, trapped in a box and hidden in the forest near the main road. The next day, the kitten was transferred to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Station near Chi Phat to be cared for and rehabilitated for possible future release.

Leopard cats are frequently traded for their fur, meat and as pets. While the suspect in this case could not be arrested, if it were not for the intervention of the Forest Protection team, this kitten would have suffered an unconscionable fate. So far this year, the rangers have rescued 388 animals and removed about 17,000 animal traps from the forest. Their ability to utilize an effective informant network, conduct vehicle checkpoints and patrol the forest for criminal activity has made the Southern Cardamom Mountains one of the best-protected rainforests in Southeast Asia. However, protecting 2 million acres of forest in a developing country like Cambodia, where funds towards environmental protection are limited, can be extremely challenging. Our ability to strengthen frontline protection, provide rangers with specialized training and drive down forest crime would not be possible without your support.

Help our Forest Protection Program continue to rescue animals and protect the Southern Cardamoms by making a gift to forest protection today!

Rangers find bucket in the forest along the road
Rangers find bucket in the forest along the road
Inside the bucket they found the little kitten
Inside the bucket they found the little kitten

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