Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Jul 18, 2014

KE Rescues Palm Civet at Restaurant

Team Leader, Sang Vanda with owner and palm civet
Team Leader, Sang Vanda with owner and palm civet

On June 16, the Kouprey Express Mobile Environmental Education Unit (KE) was headed to Mondulkiri at the invitation of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to conduct wildlife lessons. While on their way, the team stopped for lunch where they spotted an Asian palm civet being kept in a small cage. The team approached the owner of the restaurant about the civet, and he admitted to keeping it as a pet. Concerned about the safety of the animal, they explained to the owner who they were and what they do. They then encouraged him to give the civet to the team, who would then give it to the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) to be taken to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center for care. The owner at first refused, but the team was persistent and explained to him that it was illegal to keep the animal and it was also likely the civet would die in its current conditions. This persuaded the owner and he was happy to hand over the animal. The team thanked him for doing the right thing and gave him two t-shirts, five animal posters, and a hotline sticker to encourage him to report wildlife crimes, and reward him for donating the civet to the team. Furthermore, he promised to educate other villagers in the area about wildlife protection!

While rescuing animals is out of Kouprey’s project scope, the team felt it was an urgent matter that could not wait for the WRRT to come back a few days later, in case the civet was not actually a pet and was there for sale or trade. This incident also demonstrates the importance of the Kouprey Express’s role in educating citizens about wildlife, and the existing need for increased awareness in rural communities about wildlife related laws. Help the Kouprey Express make a difference through education and awareness by making a gift today!

Rescued Palm Civet
Rescued Palm Civet
KE staff giving educational material to share!
KE staff giving educational material to share!

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Jul 18, 2014

Rangers Rescue Critically Endangered Crocodile

Siamese crocodile found tied to a tree
Siamese crocodile found tied to a tree

On June 5, 2014, the Sre Ambel patrol unit rescued a baby Siamese crocodile from a wildlife poacher in Sre Ambel village. Listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, the animal's health is currently being assessed, after which it will be released into protected habitat in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range. Extinct from 99% of its original habitat, there are only around 250 Siamese crocodiles left in the wild and most make their home in the Southern Cardamoms. They are threatened by habitat destruction and are hunted extensively for their skin. The luxury market’s demand for crocodile-leather products has had devastating effects on crocodile populations all over the world. Bags and briefcases made from these endangered animals sell for thousands of dollars, making the crocodile business very lucrative for poachers and crocodile farmers. Wild caught animals are often sold into farms where they are hybridized with saltwater crocodiles, further damaging the survival prospects of the species.

The Siamese crocodile can grow to a length of 13 feet, and primarily feeds on fish but is also known to catch reptiles, amphibians, and small mammals. It reaches maturity at about 15 years, and has a lifespan of over 50 years. Once thought to be locally extinct, a small population was found concentrated in the Southwestern region of the Cardamom Mountains. Since 2002, Wildlife Alliance’s Southern Cardamom Forest Protection Program has been defending this crucial region from illegal logging, poaching, and forest fires. Help our forest rangers continue to stop wildlife crime and protect this critically endangered species from going extinct, by making a gift today!

Rangers rescuing the rare Siamese Crocodile baby.
Rangers rescuing the rare Siamese Crocodile baby.
Jul 18, 2014

Celebrate International Tiger Day this July 29

Rescued tiger at Phnom Tamao
Rescued tiger at Phnom Tamao

International Tiger Day, being celebrated this year on July 29, was established to promote public awareness and support for tiger conservation. The tiger is the world’s largest cat and is currently listed as Endangered by the IUCN. Just 100 years ago, there were as many as 100,000 wild tigers in Asia, but today, there are less than 3,000. In the last 80 years, three of the nine subspecies have gone extinct, and the futures of the other six remain dire.

Tigers once roamed the entire continent of Asia, but with human expansion they have lost over 93% of their original range. They now survive in small, isolated pockets of forest, where they are vulnerable to poaching and inbreeding. The primary threats facing tigers are habitat loss, depletion of prey species and poaching. As forests shrink and prey species become scarce, human-tiger conflict increases. And while there has been a ban on the international commercial trade of tigers since 1975, insufficient enforcement by the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) has led to sustained poaching. The illegal trade of tiger parts remains a lucrative business, with their bones, meat and skin valued at around $70,000 on the black market. In China, Vietnam, Lao PDR and Thailand, captive breeding facilities have been allowed to proliferate with little oversight and regulation. These tiger farms contribute to the commercial trade of the tiger parts, while passing as conservation breeding facilities.

Globally, the plight of the tiger remains a pressing issue, and we are on the verge of losing this beautiful and iconic species. At Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center, we care for six tigers rescued from the illegal wildlife trade, and this year you can help make a difference by donating to help care for these rescued animals. You can also join the conservation on Facebook, Twitter and Buzzfeed, to learn more about these incredible animals and help spread the word!

The tigers live in large open enclosures
The tigers live in large open enclosures
We care for 6 tigers at the Center.
We care for 6 tigers at the Center.

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