Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Aug 11, 2014

Thank You for Helping Us Protect Slow Lorises!

The infant pygmy slow loris rescued in Mondulkiri
The infant pygmy slow loris rescued in Mondulkiri

We would like to extend a special thank you to all the amazing donors that helped fund our campaign to protect the slow loris. Thanks to your generosity and kindness, we will be able to provide these rescued animals with the care they need in the hopes that one day they may be able to be released back into the wild. Since reaching our goal, there have been several new developments that have made this project even more important.

In April, an infant pygmy slow loris was rescued from the province of Mondulkiri. This orphaned loris, standing at a mere 3.5 inches in height, came to the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC) weak and helpless. He required special attention and was given round the clock care at the nursery during this critical time. We’re happy to report that he has grown stronger over the past few months and is adjusting well to his new home.

On May 28th, our family of slow lorises continued to grow with the birth of another pygmy slow loris. Traumatic experiences while being trafficked can make these highly sensitive primates difficult to keep in captivity, so the birth of the pygmy slow loris is a testament to the excellent care the dedicated staff provides for the animals. This young slow loris is doing well and is being raised by its mother – making it an excellent candidate for future release!

Your gift has been vital for providing these new arrivals with the best possible care, and we hope you’ll continue to help us make a difference by supporting our campaign to Stop Bear Trafficking in Cambodia. Sun bears and other Asian bear species are being brutally targeted by poachers in Cambodia for their body parts, and with your help we hope to drive down this insidious trade. Learn more about bear trafficking and how you can help Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team prevent these animals from going extinct here.

This pygmy slow loris will only grow to be 7"- 9"
This pygmy slow loris will only grow to be 7"- 9"

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Aug 4, 2014

Desertification Poses Major Threat to Communities

Forest Destruction
Forest Destruction

Desertification is one of the biggest environmental challenges we face, and yet most people do not fully understand it. In order to bring attention to this critical issue, we recently celebrated World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought. Desertification does not actually refer to the spread of current deserts, but rather the irreversible degradation of soil through human activities such as deforestation, unsustainable farming, mining and overgrazing. It occurs when trees and root systems that bind the soil are removed causing topsoil erosion, and when unsustainable farming practices severely deplete nutrients. The result is an infertile mix of dust and sand that transforms fragile ecosystems into barren deserts while displacing the communities that depend on the land.

This year’s theme focuses on ecosystem-based adaptation and emphasizes the benefits of sustainable land management policies and practices. Since 2001, Wildlife Alliance has preserved 1.7 million acres of forestland and planted over 730,000 trees. Through advocacy, reforestation and law enforcement, we work tirelessly to preserve remaining forest cover and reconnect the canopy in the Southern Cardamom Mountains for the people and animals that depend on it.

Aerial View of Forest Destruction
Aerial View of Forest Destruction
Planting trees to reconnect degraded forests
Planting trees to reconnect degraded forests
Jul 21, 2014

WRRT Releases Douc Langur into Protected Forest

Depressed Douc Langur
Depressed Douc Langur

Earlier this year, a concerned Ratanakiri resident contacted the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) regarding a wild black-shanked douc langur that had recently been captured by a trader. The kind resident found the langur in a market and purchased it in order to ensure that it would no longer be harmed and then contacted the WRRT through the local Forestry Administration office. The team found the dejected-looking animal tied and refusing all food. Langurs are sensitive leaf-eating monkeys and require specialized care in captivity. After explaining the situation to the owner, and examining the animal’s health, the team felt confident the langur was suitable for release.

The following day, the WRRT released the animal into protected forest in Kep Seima District of Mondulkiri Province. The area is already home to a group of wild douc langurs that the team hopes the released langur will join. As soon as he was released, his spirits revived and he immediately began happily feeding on the leaves in the trees!

Last quarter, the WRRT conducted 196 operations, rescued 514 animals and released 275 animals back into the wild. Help the team continue to rescue animals from being trafficked by making a donation today!

The WRRT with the resident that resuced the langur
The WRRT with the resident that resuced the langur
After release the animal quickly climbs a tree
After release the animal quickly climbs a tree
He started feeding immediately after release
He started feeding immediately after release

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