Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Jun 4, 2015

Endangered Gibbons Have Baby

Baby gibbon peeking out at the world
Baby gibbon peeking out at the world

Last year, our released gibbons, Baray and Saranik, gave birth to their first baby! At the end 2013, a pair of endangered pileated gibbons that were raised at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC), were successfully rehabilitated and reintroduced into the protected forest of Angkor Archaeological Park. This rehabilitation process has been in the works for over 10 years and we are excited to see the animals adjusting so well! Since their release, the gibbons have been closely monitored, and it has been quite remarkable how quickly they have adapted to their new life in the forest. Success of a reintroduction program is evaluated on the basis of survival and reproduction, and so far our gibbons are doing great. They remain a closely bonded pair, are completely self-reliant and now the latest addition to their family is another sign that they have settled into their new home!

The reintroduction of gibbons and the birth of this baby gibbon in particular is an exciting and vital step towards the conservation of this endangered species. With less than 35,000 individuals left in the wild, gibbon populations are plummeting due to hunting and habitat fragmentation. With approval from the Forestry Administration and the Apsara Authority that manages the World Heritage site, we are now in the process of releasing a second pair of gibbons into the forest. In July 2014, Bayon and Tevy were transferred to their release enclosure in Angkor Thom, where they are acclimating to their new surroundings. Once they are ready, their enclosure will be opened and these gibbons will also be free to roam the forest.

This reintroduction program at the Angkor Archaeological Park is the first of its kind in Cambodia, and we are thrilled with the results so far. Help us continue to rebuild gibbon populations in Asia, release other endangered animals and be at the forefront of conservation and wildlife protection!

Mom towards the end of her 7 month pregnancy
Mom towards the end of her 7 month pregnancy
Baby at 4 months - growing more independent!
Baby at 4 months - growing more independent!
Dad, ever watchful of the little family!
Dad, ever watchful of the little family!

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May 28, 2015

My Visit to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center

Chhouk and his new prosthetic
Chhouk and his new prosthetic

Guest Blog and photos by Robert Rosenthal on his visit to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center.

Pikas! Elephants! A baby macaque! The huge-eyed loris! 

As great as it is to meet these incredible creatures, it’s even more exciting – to me, at least! – to learn about the teams, programs, and strategies that are supporting their rehabilitation, care, and (in many cases) return to the wild.

Since early 2014, I’ve traveled through a big part of Southeast and South Asia, exploring the work of NGOs and getting to know many great people who are working with local communities to support sustainable development and protect natural resources. This month marks the anniversary of one of my favorite visits of all, when I was fortunate to be invited to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center as a field rep of GlobalGiving, tasked with seeing the work of Phnom Tamao and its partner Wildlife Alliance in action. I thought I would share a few thoughts about my experience.

I met with Tori Evans and Emma Pollard, both Wildlife Tour guides at Phnom Tamao, as well as Amy Van Nice, International Development Manager and leader of the Kouprey Express Mobile Environmental Education program. I saw current and in-the-works animal enclosures, was introduced to newly rescued animals like a truly amazing slow loris, as well as longtime animal residents like Lucky the Elephant. I also got to watch local kids during a Kouprey Express sponsored field trip, work on wildlife conservation projects.

Most importantly for me, I got a glimpse of the team at Phnom Tamao in action on the funding side to advance its mission and shared goals.

Through good timing, the day I visited, a Cambodian business leader was making a sizable donation, and I was able to watch how the center works to magnify fundraising activities for even greater outcomes. In this case, a $5,000 gift from a local business was recognized with a well attended photo op represented by many members of the local community – a sure sign that other donors will be inspired as well. The gift will be used to pay for two new prosthetics for Chhouk, an Asian elephant who lost a foot in a trap set by rural poachers. I observed the press op, met Chhouk, and watched Chhouk's mahout changing his prosthetic. More than a dozen representatives from the company were on hand, all expertly handled throughout.

The whole experience gave me a lot of insight into the organization's ability to work closely with business leaders to advance its mission and shared goals – a huge must in today’s NGO fundraising climate.

The Author with a Rescued Baby Macaque
The Author with a Rescued Baby Macaque
Watching the Photo Op for the donation made
Watching the Photo Op for the donation made
Students on a Kouprey Express Wildlife Field Trip
Students on a Kouprey Express Wildlife Field Trip
May 13, 2015

Thank You for Helping us Protect Primates!

Rare baby douc langur rescued by the WRRT
Rare baby douc langur rescued by the WRRT

This week, we launched a microproject to help the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) rescue trafficked primates in Cambodia. We would like to thank you for your continued support, and share some of the important work the WRRT does to combat this illicit trade.

There are 634 species and subspecies of primates in the world, from humans and apes to monkeys and prosimians. These incredible animals are known to show a range of emotion, have opposable thumbs, use tools and have complex, species-specific social behaviors. People are often fascinated by these diverse, highly intelligent, social creatures, because so much of our own behavior and evolution is reflected in them. Sadly the future of mankind’s closest relatives is uncertain. Rampant habitat destruction exacerbated by poaching for food and to supply traditional Chinese medicine and the illegal pet trade are decimating primate populations. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), 48% percent of all primate species are threatened, and over 70% of Asian primates are facing extinction. In Cambodia nine out of the 10 primate species are listed as either Endangered or Threatened. Entire families and troops are caught in order to be sold as food or for lab research, and infants are torn away from their mother and sold into the exotic pet trade until owners realize they cannot control these wild animals.

While the situation maybe dire, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) is actively fighting to protect these 10 species before it’s too late. Since 2001, the WRRT, a law enforcement squad devoted solely to combating the illegal wildlife trade, has rescued over 2,500 gibbons, langurs, macaques and lorises. Last year alone, the team rescued 85 live primates from 8 different species. Seven of the 8 species types rescued last year are listed by the IUCN as Vulnerable, Endangered, or Critically Endangered, all with decreasing population trends. The WRRT’s presence in Cambodia to rescue primates and halt the illegal wildlife and pet trade is critical. Every individual primate rescued is significant to the survival and continuation of the species. Rescued animals that can no longer survive in the wild are given a life-long home at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC).

Caretakers at PTWRC work hard to rehabilitate the animals, and house them in spacious enclosures to facilitate natural behavior. These large, natural enclosures enable the process of de-humanization in order to make their offspring suitable for reintroduction into the wild. Wildlife Alliance has been reintroducing primates back into the wild for several years, most notably with the recent release of gibbons and langurs into the Angkor Temple Forest Complex. It costs the WRRT approximately $55 to rescue a primate and approximately $500 to conduct a successful operation. This consists of paying informants, researching trade networks, conducting undercover investigations, saving the animals, and providing care to rescued animals during transit to a release site or Phnom Tamao Rescue Center. This Bonus Day, make your gift go even further by supporting our new campaign to Help Rescue Primates from Illegal Trafficking! Your gift will help the WRRT continue to protect, conserve and save primate species in Cambodia!

Endangered gibbon captured from the forest
Endangered gibbon captured from the forest
Baby pygmy slow loris rescued from the pet trade
Baby pygmy slow loris rescued from the pet trade
Baby black shanked douc langur kept as a pet
Baby black shanked douc langur kept as a pet

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