Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Jul 18, 2014

Celebrate International Tiger Day this July 29

Rescued tiger at Phnom Tamao
Rescued tiger at Phnom Tamao

International Tiger Day, being celebrated this year on July 29, was established to promote public awareness and support for tiger conservation. The tiger is the world’s largest cat and is currently listed as Endangered by the IUCN. Just 100 years ago, there were as many as 100,000 wild tigers in Asia, but today, there are less than 3,000. In the last 80 years, three of the nine subspecies have gone extinct, and the futures of the other six remain dire.

Tigers once roamed the entire continent of Asia, but with human expansion they have lost over 93% of their original range. They now survive in small, isolated pockets of forest, where they are vulnerable to poaching and inbreeding. The primary threats facing tigers are habitat loss, depletion of prey species and poaching. As forests shrink and prey species become scarce, human-tiger conflict increases. And while there has been a ban on the international commercial trade of tigers since 1975, insufficient enforcement by the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) has led to sustained poaching. The illegal trade of tiger parts remains a lucrative business, with their bones, meat and skin valued at around $70,000 on the black market. In China, Vietnam, Lao PDR and Thailand, captive breeding facilities have been allowed to proliferate with little oversight and regulation. These tiger farms contribute to the commercial trade of the tiger parts, while passing as conservation breeding facilities.

Globally, the plight of the tiger remains a pressing issue, and we are on the verge of losing this beautiful and iconic species. At Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center, we care for six tigers rescued from the illegal wildlife trade, and this year you can help make a difference by donating to help care for these rescued animals. You can also join the conservation on Facebook, Twitter and Buzzfeed, to learn more about these incredible animals and help spread the word!

The tigers live in large open enclosures
The tigers live in large open enclosures
We care for 6 tigers at the Center.
We care for 6 tigers at the Center.
Jun 23, 2014

Bear Cubs Rescued From Bile Trade

The Young Bears Being Transported by the WRRT
The Young Bears Being Transported by the WRRT

On May 19th, Wildlife Alliance’s Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) and Southern Cardamom Forest Protection Program received a tip from an informant about two bears being held captive in a village in Kampong Speu Province. The teams responded immediately and surrounded the suspected trader’s house. The offenders became increasingly aggressive and refused to allow staff to search the residence. To prevent the traders from escaping, the team waited outside while a warrant to search the premises was obtained. The search resulted in the rescue of two young Asiatic black bears.

Further investigation revealed that the offender’s husband was a convicted wildlife trader and that there is a warrant out for his arrest. The team also discovered a Vietnamese registered motorcycle on the premises, and it is likely these two bear cubs would have been sold to bile farms in Vietnam. Bears are often kept in alive in these farms where their gall bladder and bile is harvested and sold as traditional medicine. The female offender was charged under Article 98 of the Forestry Law for Possessing Endangered Wildlife and is currently in pre-trial detention.

While the team has made remarkable advances in tearing down the wildlife trade network in Cambodia, the deterrents are not enough to put an end to wildlife crime. Over the past few years, wildlife trade in the region has become increasingly sophisticated and animals are now being transported from Thailand into Cambodia and then onto Vietnam. In response to this crisis, the WRRT is focusing its efforts on transnational smuggling, and last week’s successful rescue is another example of the WRRT working aggressively to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade in the entire region.

Help us continue to stop bear trafficking in Cambodia by making a gift and sharing our project!

Two Asiatic Black Bear Cubs Were Rescued
Two Asiatic Black Bear Cubs Were Rescued
Offender in Jail
Offender in Jail
Jun 3, 2014

A New Chapter for CADP

Female community leaders at the community orchard
Female community leaders at the community orchard

In 2004, Wildlife Alliance worked with 187 landless families to help them escape poverty and generate a sustainable and dependable income. The Community Agriculture Development Project (CADP) was implemented in Sovanna Baitong for forest dwellers previously engaged in destructive slash-and-burn farming practices and wildlife poaching. Today, each family lives and works on their own 1.5 hectares of agricultural land, growing cash and subsistence crops using modern agricultural methods, like efficient drip irrigation, to generate income year round. However, in order for any community project to achieve autonomy, it is vital for it to be economically self-sufficient, politically supported by regional and national governments, and locally driven and managed. This year, the Community Agriculture Development Project at Sovanna Baitong moves closer to achieving all of these goals.

One of the first steps taken to achieve financial sustainability was the creation of the Community Orchard, which will increase income for community members through the cultivation of high-yield cash crops. The development of the Community Orchard began at the end of last year, and if projections bear out, the orchard should be fully supporting the community within 3-5 years.

On March 18, the Ministry of Interior officially recognized the community of Sovanna Baitong as a township. A ceremony was held on May 9 with representatives from the local, provincial and district government in attendance. This kind of regional support for the community is necessary to ensure the long term success of the project.

And lastly, at the beginning of this year, the project was handed over to Khmer staff for management. The project was always designed to empower civil society and incorporate community members in decision-making processes. However, passing on leadership responsibilities to Cambodians will ensure that the project is internally motivated to stay active. In January, Ms. Pich Sokhany succeeded Gil-ad Chen as the project manager of both CADP and the Tropical Reforestation Project. Sokhany is both qualified and well suited for the position. She graduated from the Royal University of Law and Economics in Phnom Penh with a degree in Accounting, and has worked as the assistant manager and accountant for the project since 2007. Having risen through the ranks as a female manager in a male-dominated field, she has accomplished a great deal and has proved to be a determined and effective leader. She cares passionately about Wildlife Alliance’s mission to alleviate poverty, and protect forests and wildlife, and is excited to help CADP transition into a self-reliant autonomous community.

Help the community of Sovanna Baitong achieve autonomy and sustainability by making a small donation today!

Opening ceremony held on May 9th
Opening ceremony held on May 9th
Suwanna Gauntlett with new project manager Sokhany
Suwanna Gauntlett with new project manager Sokhany
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