Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Apr 11, 2012

Clinic for Baby Animals at Phnom Tamao

Chhouk with Nick Marx
Chhouk with Nick Marx

Our Care for Rescued Wildlife team does an incredible job of caring for the animals Wildlife Alliance rescues from the illegal wildlife trade – the most vulnerable of which are the babies, especially those that have lost their mothers or been separated from their family groups.  So far, our track record in nurturing baby animals is good – but it can be better.  Animals like Chhouk – who was just a baby and missing a leg when we found him in the forest – can survive and even thrive under the expert care of our team.  But the facilities we currently have are sorely lacking when one considers the level of care that is necessary to ensure the survival of these most defenseless victims of wildlife trafficking.  Watch the video below to see what Wildlife Alliance does to help these and all the animals at Phnom Tamao against great odds.

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Mar 14, 2012

Postcard: Project Site Visit

Seed preparation for re-forestation
Seed preparation for re-forestation

Jacqueline Lee is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving who is visiting our partners’ projects throughout Southeast Asia. Her “Postcard” from the visit in Chi Phat, Cambodia:

On March 6 after patrolling the forests of Cambodia with Wildlife Alliance's Ranger team, I went with Amy, Wildlife Alliance's International Development Manager, to experience Wildlife Alliance join forces with the communiities to take care of baby plants in order to RE-forest destroyed pieces of land.

Past the ecotourism village and the windy roads lined by houses now growing sustainable farming (not slash-and-burn farming) thanks to Wildlife Alliance, deep into the forest and over a small river - we arrived at the re-forestation nursery and staff house. There we were welcomed by the 2 live in staff overseeing the re-forestation - Annette and Ariel. They were warm and welcoming sharing stories and experiences, along with challenges and hopes for the project and living so far separated from the city.

The next morning bright and early - I watched the villagers arrive and joined to observe the daily process of what it takes to RE-FOREST a destroyed and practically now barren chunk of forest. There were 3 overall steps: (1)Seed preparation, (2) Greenhouse, and (3) Shade Net.

Seed prep involves collecting local seeds, testing what soil works best, if it needs lime to balance ph, and what supports the best growth. Then the seds are peeled, treated and planted.

Greenhouse involves misting and "nursing" of the baby seeds - each delicate and struggling for survivial.

Once large enough they are transerred to the Shade Net area where they are replanted in larger bags with natural fertilizer and tended to until large enough to be transered strategically to mimic a natural forest process to the large plots of destroyed land.

At the time there were 22 workders but I was told taht during planting season there could be as many as 80 - all from local villages. It was wonderful to learn that the villagers felt invested in the land that they previously used to burn and take from, now working to create and plant back into. This program was changing the mentality for wokders because they now could identify with not only the work it goes into to re-create the forest but also to take care of it and sustain it along with the fruits it could provide in a sustainable way. And what's more- once these were planted... the land became officially protected even by government from development and destruction. So far this project has plotted over 37,000 trees and almost 500 hectares todate. 

This project was empowering communities and protecting forests - and it was very exciting and eye-opening to first hand experience how easy and quick it is to destroy a forest that can essentially provide everything you need... and then how much work, time, and patience it takes to rebuild that environment.

For more details and pictures about my visit please visit: JacquelineInTheField 

Transfering Seedlings to Shade Net
Transfering Seedlings to Shade Net

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Mar 14, 2012

Postcard: Project Site Visit

Confiscated Motorbikes from Illegal Activity
Confiscated Motorbikes from Illegal Activity

Jacqueline Lee is an InTheField Traveler with GlobalGiving who is visiting our partners’ projects throughout Southeast Asia. Her “Postcard” from the visit in Cambodia:

Patrolling the jungle and “Viper Valley” for poachers and illegal activity, ambushing culprits, and releasing trapped endangered animals back to their homes - all in a normal day with Wildlife Alliance's Rangers.

Bright and early March 8, 2012 – I met with Amy, International  Development Manager, and Eddie, Head of the Ranger Program, at their main Cambodia office in Phnom Penh to depart for the forests of Chi  Phat and the surrounding province. I was able to visit 2 of the 6 ranger stations, where rangers rest, plan, and prep for patrols, ambushes, and arrests of those trying to take away endangered plants and animals for markets including exotic pets, medicines, and even food in other countries.

Finally, we arrived at the first Ranger patrol station – I was welcomed with a red carpet salute by local military and rangers. From there I was shown all of the confiscated trappings and vehicles from people illegally hunting and cutting wood (protected wood that is worth a lot of the market - so much that people will risk class 1 misdemeanors resulting in immediate jail time if caught).  

Although very exciting, the life of the rangers seemed extremely tough - their motorbikes were parked in the back with small packs ready to go into the forest for days at a time: sleeping,  patrolling, and laying in wait to protect each team's designated area of land (which is extremely large). Out there they are all against the elements - mosquitoes, snakes, heat, and whatever else that can be thrown their way. They even have to sleep in mobile hammocks off the ground to keep from snakes and spiders. Additionally, their equipment and bikes have to withstand the elements therefore items like their boots are vital for their safety and experience the most wear and tear.

Currently the patrol stations are strategically placed along the water transport and road transport areas, but with increased control, those who are willing to break the law are trying to find creative ways to avoid the authority of Wildlife Alliance. Therefore, Eddie showed me the goals and hopes for expansion deeper into the forest along the north in order to stop their access that way - although it would be harder and longer to get to as well as get out if a medical emergency occurred. The criminals are getting more sneaky and creative in their activities.

I asked one of the rangers what brought him to Wildlife Alliance, and he said his "love of forest, animals, and conservation." I responded if he was not with WA where would he be - and he said he was previously with the Cambodian Royal Embassy Military.

Right before my arrival - the teams had just rescued and released 25 monkeys back to the forest. While on patrol - I was able to see some monkeys playing and exploring along the river.. a very exciting experience for me. In the end, Eddie shared that because of the efforts of Wildlife Alliance - in 10 years 6 our of 7 land titles wre canceled last year protecting the area from deforestation and development - and keeping a home for this native wildlife, flora, and fauna.

Thank you Eddie and Amy for the adventurous and insightful site visit!

For more details and pictures about my visit please visit: JacquelineInTheField 

On Patrol with Wildlife Alliance Rangers
On Patrol with Wildlife Alliance Rangers

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