Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Oct 28, 2014

Reforestation Changed the Life of this Cambodian Woman

Sao joined the project in 2008
Sao joined the project in 2008

“Despite the difficult work, seeing trees grow makes me happy,” declared Sao, a shy 24-year-old woman who has been working at Wildlife Alliance’s Tropical Reforestation Project in Chi Phat since its inception in 2008. Over the years, Sao has dedicated her life to reconnecting fragmented forests in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range. She knows the painstaking process that goes into the planting and nurturing of a seed into maturity. She understands from first-hand experience that it is not enough to just plant a seed. A great deal of work and care is required for each seedling to survive, and once planted, must be continually maintained and protected. It pains her to see the prolific illegal logging that plagues the region, “I’ve been working at the project for over five years now, and I have come to thoroughly understand what it really takes to bring back trees lost to deforestation.”

Sao says she feels lucky to be working at Wildlife Alliance’s Reforestation Project. She cares deeply about her work, and has helped grow and maintain over 733,000 trees on 1,811 acres of reforested land. She believes that work at the Project has completely changed the course of her life. With no education, and as a young, unmarried woman in rural Cambodia, Sao had very few opportunities available to her. However, her steady income has lifted her out of poverty and is helping her realize her dream of one day opening a small grocery store in Chi Phat. Her life changed even more drastically in 2011 when she married her friend and coworker Vuthu. The couple plans to build a house together in Chi Phat and start a family soon.

Wildlife Alliance’s Tropical Reforestation Project in the Southern Cardamom Mountains employs 114 community members, providing them with a steady income and an alternative to slash-and-burn farming. Help us continue to not only restore the Southern Cardamom Mountains, but also make a difference in the lives of community members like Sao by making a gift today!

Sao has helped the project plant 733,000 trees
Sao has helped the project plant 733,000 trees
Oct 23, 2014

Baby Gibbon Born to Released Parents

Saranik with her first baby
Saranik with her first baby

We are very excited to announce that our released gibbons, Baray and Saranik, gave birth to their first baby earlier this month! At the end of last year, a pair of endangered pileated gibbons that were raised at Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC), were successfully rehabilitated and reintroduced into the protected forest of Angkor Archaeological Park. Since their release, the gibbons have been closely monitored, and it has been quite remarkable how quickly they have adapted to their new life in the forest. Success of a reintroduction program is evaluated on the basis of survival and reproduction, and so far our gibbons are doing great. They remain a closely bonded pair, are completely self-reliant and now the latest addition to their family is another sign that they have settled into their new home!

The reintroduction of gibbons and the birth of this baby gibbon in particular is an exciting and vital step towards the conservation of this endangered species. With less than 35,000 individuals left in the wild, gibbon populations are plummeting due to hunting and habitat fragmentation. With approval from the Forestry Administration and the Apsara Authority that manages the World Heritage site, we are now in the process of releasing a second pair of gibbons into the forest. In July 2014, Bayon and Tevy were transferred to their release enclosure in Angkor Thom, where they are acclimating to their new surroundings. Once they are ready, their enclosure will be opened and these gibbons will also be free to roam the forest.

This reintroduction program at the Angkor Archaeological Park is the first of its kind in Cambodia, and we are thrilled with the results so far. Thank you for helping us continue to rebuild gibbon populations in Asia and be at the forefront of conservation and wildlife protection!

Click here to watch a video of the new born baby with his mom!

Pregnant - the gestation period is about 7 months
Pregnant - the gestation period is about 7 months
A closely bonded pair that is thriving in the wild
A closely bonded pair that is thriving in the wild

Links:

Oct 21, 2014

WRRT Raids Major Trafficking Ring (Graphic Images)

Confiscated Endangered Animal Parts
Confiscated Endangered Animal Parts

On October 7, 2014, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) busted a prominent wildlife trader in Phnom Penh, and discovered a staggering amount of valuable wildlife products. After receiving intelligence through our informant network, the team worked tirelessly through the night to conduct the investigation and document evidence in order to execute one of the largest raids in recent years. Parts from extremely endangered and rare species were seized, and several live animals were rescued. Seizures included 19 clouded leopard skins, 3 leopard skins, 2 Asian golden cat skins, 6 clouded leopard paws, 10 otter skins, 2 fake tiger skins and other body parts. Many of the skins were fresh and still drying on wooden frames, indicating that the house was used as a regular transit warehouse and that freshly caught animals were being slaughtered and skinned there. The skin drying process was clean and professional, and the skins were of very good quality, all details indicating that the shipment was destined for high-end market buyers, most probably in China and Vietnam. In the back of the house, the team found 3 long-tailed macaques that were to be sold as lab animals for medical experimentation in Vietnam, and rare turtles including 1 Asiatic soft-shell turtle, 4 snail-eating turtles, and 1 box turtle destined to be used in soup. The villa housing these illicit goods belongs to the China Sichuan & Chongqing Chamber of Commerce in Tuol Sangke, Phnom Penh. Three Chinese nationals were found inside the house, and were interrogated by the team. The Forestry Administration officers and military police worked until midnight to finish the interrogations, document the identities of the offenders, and impose strict penalties according to the Forestry Law.

We are concerned that Cambodia is becoming a more frequent transit point for the illegal wildlife trade to China. This has been demonstrated through recent confiscations of African ivory and rhino horn seized in Cambodia at international airports and harbors on its way from Africa to Vietnam and China. In response to this crisis, the WRRT is focusing its efforts on transnational smuggling, and this successful operation is another example of the WRRT working aggressively to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade in the entire region. Help the team continue fight wildlife trafficking in the region by making a donation, or sharing our work to spread awareness!

19 Clouded Leopard Skins Found
19 Clouded Leopard Skins Found
The macaquest rescued from the villa
The macaquest rescued from the villa
Rescued turtles that will later be released
Rescued turtles that will later be released

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