Wildlife Alliance

Wildlife Alliance is the leader in direct protection to forests and wildlife in the Southeast Asian tropical belt. Our mission is to combat deforestation, extinction, climate change, and poverty by partnering with local communities and governments.
Jul 24, 2015

Celebrate Global Tiger Day by Planting a Tree!

Help Raise Awareness!
Help Raise Awareness!

Join us in celebrating International Tiger Day, on July 29, 2015! This day was established to promote public awareness and support for tiger conservation. The tiger is the world’s largest cat and is currently listed as Endangered by the IUCN.

Throughout history, the tiger has provoked a sense of awe and admiration. Its prowess, ferocity, beauty and agility have incited the imagination - inspiring countless stories, paintings, poems and sculptures. The earliest tiger statue found was made in China almost 7,000 years ago! Revered in ancient and modern culture, the tiger is a symbol of power and strength. It is also the national animal of Malaysia, South Korea, Bangladesh and India. However, the king of the jungle is more than just a cultural symbol; it is also a top predator and a keystone species that maintains the balance of entire ecosystems. Saving tigers requires maintaining a sufficient prey base and saving enough forest to support their populations – a trickledown effect that will save hundreds of plant and animal species. A healthy wild tiger population means a thriving jungle ecosystem, which in turn provides long-term benefits for both humans and wildlife.

Tigers once roamed the entire continent of Asia, but with human expansion they have lost over 93% of their original range. They now survive in small, isolated pockets of forest, where they are vulnerable to poaching and inbreeding. The primary threats facing tigers are habitat loss, depletion of prey species and poaching. As forests shrink and prey species become scarce, human-tiger conflict increases. Since 2001, Wildlife Alliance has been dedicated to the conservation of this iconic species. Our Forest Protection program protects 1.7 million acres of critical forest habitat in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range and our Reforestation program aims to reconnect fragmented forests so that the remaining tigers are free to roam. At Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center (PTWRC), Wildlife Alliance cares for five tigers rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. PTWRC is also a breeding facility for important prey species like muntjac, Eld’s deer and sambar.

Thank you for helping us plant trees in the Southern Cardamom Mountain Range – keeping one of Asia's last major forests intact. Illegal logging and slash-and-burn farming threaten to fragment this 2 million acre forest that is home to some of the last tigers in Asia, and the world’s other iconic and endangered animals. To revive decimated areas, Wildlife Alliance and local communities are working together to plant trees and maintain continuous forest cover. Your gift helps reverse the effects of deforestation, preserve watersheds, and provide livelihoods to local communities, and connect critical tiger hagitat. You do more than put a seed in the ground — you ensure the sustainability of the tropical rainforest for future generations.

Make a difference this International Tiger Day by helping us continue to preserve forests and wildlife habitats in Cambodia and reconnect fragmented forests for tigers. We will also be celebrating all week, by posting fun tiger facts, pictures, and stories on our social media platforms. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to learn more about these incredible animals, and help raise awareness!

Tiger habitat is shrinking at an alarming rate.
Tiger habitat is shrinking at an alarming rate.
It is estimated on 3,000 wild tigers survive.
It is estimated on 3,000 wild tigers survive.
Help connect fragmented forests!
Help connect fragmented forests!
Jul 15, 2015

Make it a Bonus Day for Rescued Animals!

Endangered baby fishing cat born at the Center
Endangered baby fishing cat born at the Center

A special update from Wildlife Programs Director, Nick Marx.

Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Centre (PTWRC) serves as a refuge for all the animals rescued from the illegal wildlife trade. It is managed by the Cambodian Forestry Administration, and with the assistance of Wildlife Alliance, has developed into one of the best wildlife rescue centers in any developing country. In many ways, it is an inspired choice of site for such a facility. PTWRC is set in 2,300 hectares of forest, and many animals can be released here once they have recovered from their injuries. Keepers have been trained to a high standard and despite their meager salaries; they do a responsible and attentive job caring for their animals.

There are wild animals living in the surrounding forest, many of which we released. We have created teams of community rangers who patrol the area to ensure the safety of the animals and the protection of the forest. Released animals include sambar and muntjac deer, wild boar, macaques, civets, leopard cats, mongooses, jackal, porcupines and different species of birds and reptiles.

It has been a busy and difficult year at Phnom Tamao. Since mid-February our over-riding concern has been for Lucky, our 16 year old female elephant, who has been fighting for her life. Fortunately, after intensive treatment, we are now seeing improvements and can safely say that she is finally on the mend.

In just three months, there have been 139 new arrivals. These included two silvered langurs, a sun bear, a small toothed palm civet, a ferret badger, two leopard cats, a baby yellow-cheeked gibbon and two green peafowl to accompany the usual long tailed macaques, parakeets, lorises, common palm civets and pythons we see every month. The endangered yellow-cheeked gibbon is only the third of this species we have received at PTWRC. This may be because it is easier for any captured yellow-cheeked babies to be quickly transported to Vietnam before we hear about them. In Cambodia, yellow-cheeked gibbons live east of the River Mekong (closer to the Vietnamese border), while pileated gibbons, which we see very regularly, inhabit the western side.

Early in the year, feral dogs attacked a wild female sambar and her fawn in the forest. The mother sustained some injuries, but managed to escape. We captured the fawn, which sustained wounds and a broken leg. He was raised at our Nursery and has done very well. The fracture was too low down on the leg and could not be pinned, but he has recovered well. A young serow that was rescued at the end of 2014, with a bullet wound to her shoulder, has recovered and is now weaned and we must find the funds to construct an enclosure for her to pair her up with a male.

119 animals were released during the past three months into protected forest in Phnom Tamao as well as in the Southern Cardamom Mountains.

There were also 22 births at the Center, including a binturong, an Eld’s deer, an endangered fishing cat, a pig tailed macaque, and four hedgehogs. Five painted storks hatched in our water bird aviary. Sadly, in March, Cataracts, our first gibbon ever to breed at PTWRC passed away due to problems with an unborn baby. She had many babies and was a wonderful mother, caring for every one perfectly, one of which we have released into the Angkor forest. She loved people and used to take the hand of visitors and place it on her own head for a stroke! She is greatly missed.

We would like to sincerely thank you for your generous support, and for ensuring that no rescued animal is ever turned away.

- Nick Marx

We hope you will consider making your gift go further by taking advantage of GlobalGiving’s biggest Bonus Day of the year! On July 15th, donations of up to $1,000 made through GlobalGiving will be matched at 50% while funds last - hurry because funds run out quickly! With your help, we can continue to give rescued animals a second chance at life!

Endangered yellow-cheeked gibbon baby
Endangered yellow-cheeked gibbon baby
Slow lorises rescued from a market
Slow lorises rescued from a market
Beloved Cataracts, always an attentive mother
Beloved Cataracts, always an attentive mother
Curious little fishing cat kitten
Curious little fishing cat kitten
Jul 14, 2015

Help the WRRT Stop Wildlife Traders this Bonus Day!

Highly valued horns and reptiles
Highly valued horns and reptiles

On June 2, 2015, the Wildlife Rapid Rescue Team (WRRT) conducted two major raids that resulted in the confiscation of 44 various horns and skulls and the rescue of 82 live animals. The day began with a house raid in O’Krieng Village in the Sambo District of Kratie Province. The team received information about the trader from its network of informants and subsequently conducted investigations and surveillance on the suspect. Once their investigations confirmed that the trader was involved in illegal wildlife dealing, the WRRT went into action.

At dawn, the WRRT surrounded the house, preventing the trader from escaping or destroying evidence. Once inside, the team apprehended the suspected trader and conducted its search of the property, ultimately rescuing 27 Bengal monitors, one water monitor, three elongated tortoises, five rat snakes, one myna, and one changeable hawk! Unfortunately, the team isn’t always able to save every animal from this cruel trade. That morning, the WRRT also seized 31 various horns and 12 muntjac skulls and 0.2 kg of bear bone. These items are highly valued in traditional Chinese medicine, and the trade is putting a tremendous strain on wild populations.

Later that day, the team travelled to Tapaing Pring Village where they conducted a similar raid. The WRRT rescued four king cobras, 8 rat snakes, 23 tortoises, three civets, one softshell turtle, four Bengal monitors, and one python. In both instances, the traders were levied heavy fines, rescued animals were taken to Phnom Tamao Wildlife Rescue Center, and confiscated wildlife parts were destroyed.

Driven by the sharp rise in demand for rare animal products in countries like China and Vietnam, the prolific trade in illegal wildlife is estimated to be worth $19 billion. The WRRT works tirelessly to protect Cambodia’s wildlife, by investigating traders and bringing them to justice.

Thank you for your continued support and dedication to stopping wildlife trafficking. Make your gift go further this Bonus Day! On July 15th, donations of up to $1,000 made through GlobalGiving will be matched at 50% while funds last - hurry because funds run out quickly! With your help, we can stop Cambodia's wildlife from being hunted to extinction before it's too late!

Mark your calendars for July 15th and don't forget to share this great opportunity with your friends!

The WRRT is a Forestry Administration law enforcement unit led by the Forestry Administration, in cooperation with the Military Police, with technical and financial support from Wildlife Alliance.

WRRT with apprehended traders
WRRT with apprehended traders
82 lives animals rescued and 44 horns confiscated
82 lives animals rescued and 44 horns confiscated

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