Going to School Fund

Going to School creates design-driven stories to teach India's poorest children skills at school. We're an award-winning nonprofit trust with a 10-year track record of inspiring millions of children in India to stay in school, learn skills, use their education to transform their lives and create their own opportunities. Our journey began in 2003 when we created Going to School in India, a children's book that tells 25 stories of what school can be, from going to school in a tent in a desert to going to school in the dark with solar lanterns. We made the book into a pioneering TV series that aired on India's leading television networks reaching 65 million children. Our next series, Girl Stars...
Apr 19, 2013

Let's go to the bank (at school)

Mavis Ratna Singh’s class of Grade 9 boys at Daroga Prasad High School was the first to complete Book 15: Manjeri’s Business Loan and one week later, they crossed the finish line: they went to the bank to understand just how it works.

Be! works like this: after reading the story, kids are asked to; choose the business they’d like to start, making sure it solves a social, economic or environmental problem. They write a mini business plan and do the numbers and calculations to make a cash flow statement. From this they can then determine the size of loan they would need to take from the bank to start their business.

Now, the kids are ready to visit the local bank! 

But before they do, they prepare and write down the questions they want to ask the Bank Manager about how to take a loan.

Mavis called the SBI Bank Manager and got permission for the boys to visit. He said YES. She had also asked permission from her school Principal who was very supportive and helped in the planning and arrangements of the visit.

On Saturday, Mavis then set out with as many boys as possible stuffed in her car and a fleet of more boys followed on their bicycles. The fifteen boys who got permission had prepared their questions (with help from their friends) and Mavis gave them numbers to set the order in which to ask questions.

The Bank Manager, Mr. Kumar was absolutely delighted by the visit. He could not believe it these young boys had such insightful questions. They were so polite. It was exactly what should happen at school, a visit to the bank! He ended the day by saying: “I’m so impressed by all of you and I wish you all well in the future!” He then gave every boy a chocolate.

Mavis tells us the boys enjoyed the field trip so much that they wanted it to last longer. Her only regret was that she could not take more children. It seems like everyone in the ‘Going to...’ program (that’s what they call us, not Going to School :)) wanted to go too, but the Principal had only allowed fifteen in the first go because of safety and permission.

As the visit was such a success and all the boys were talking about at school, they arranged it again for the next Saturday. And this time we went along...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQW1q7GMRlI&feature=share&list=UUnLSJaciXxDwvUCuHyFqs8w

Links:

Jan 15, 2013

Skills@Scale: postcards & prizes, recognizing the little things in 2013

Skills@scale: Postcards & prizes, recognizing the little things in 2013

When Sarwat, one of our team members, visited a school last month, the children recognized her immediately: “You wrote to us!” they exclaimed and Sarwat nodded, removing another surprise from her bag: a backpack for young girl with the best project.

You see, for most of 2012, the team in Bihar and Delhi, had been overwhelmed by the quality and design of children’s projects that we collect each week: thousands of children have been hard at work collecting giant yellow chart paper with glitter, ribbon, interwoven two colour drawings, intricate design, even 3D models and portraits. So while we collect and grade each project, and we’d sent postcards, we decided we needed to do more. We thought we’d visit schools as a surprise, and reward children whose projects were superlative.

We’ve been delighted that children and teachers were quite plainly shocked to see us coming to meet them personally with prizes. Teachers and principals were extremely proud that their students were recognized and rewarded. Now, there is no going back. While we will continue to track each child and school by the number of skills projects we collect each week, and their grades for each project, we know there is no replacement for surprises, personal connections and recognition. And we know this means we’ll be writing even more postcards, and making even more visits with prizes in 2013.

Links:

Nov 14, 2012

Going to School, why stories change the world

Going to School in India Mini-books, are a celebration of what school can be, from going to school in a tent in a mud desert to going to school in the dark with solar lanterns. These stories have been shared with children across India for almost 10 years, and still, we receive almost daily requests from children, teachers and schools to receive the stories. Perhaps, because 10 years later, it's still a story that children want to read - about school, about other children, with colorful, beautiful design and photography, a story about how fun school can be in India.

Thank you for making our 10 year celebration possible, as we head into 2013, we'll be celebrating all year to send as many books as we can to children in Government Schools in India. 

Over the past four months, we've our set of 10 books to many schools and in each set, we place a stack of pre-paid postcards for children to send us their responses and questions. It's wonderful to receive postcards from children. In the age of online, email and APPS, it's still only a book that reaches the poorest children in India and in response, a postcard that they can send to us.

‘Going to School in a Mud Desert’ is the most popular story! Saurabh Anand from 10th standard wrote, ‘It’s amazing how children come from far and wide to attend this school in the desert, where there was no water to drink for miles and miles. Some of these children dreamed of being teachers in this very school in a tent.” Prakash from a school in Udaipur wrote, “For a child to walk barefooted to a school in the desert takes true will power. So much, for a good education. We should all learn from this story.” These postcards inspire us, we hope they inspire you too.

With our best wishes,

 

Going to School.

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?