La Reserva Forest Foundation

La Reserva Forest Foundation is a Costa Rican non-profit, tax exempt foundation working to restore and preserve native tropical forests, dedicated to creating "tree bridges" linking isolated forest islands using volunteers and the local school communities, and fighting global warming through various carbon neutral projects.
Mar 2, 2011

Behind the Scenes at LRFF

Male Trogon near La Reserva
Male Trogon near La Reserva

When I worked for a large school district I was continually struck by the fact that the day-to-day operations of each of the schools was made possible by their clerical staff. It was the folks sitting at their computers who kept things functioning at a level that allowed teachers to create a functional learning environment within their classrooms. 

It’s no different at LRFF. We recognize that the exciting part of the work we do is starting nurseries, planting trees, and documenting their amazing growth, but none of that can happen without the many hours put in at the computer by Roberta and whatever volunteers she can find to help her. She started this whole enterprise using a 2004 mac laptop - which, amazingly enough, is still in use! She reports, however, that the screen is  on its last legs.

Your donations made possible the purchase of a new (used) iMac which was installed a few months ago in the back bedroom-turned-office. It has been an enormous boon. But meetings with the municipality, the Biological Corridor committee, and the Maleku Tribal Council, as well as presentations to school groups and potential donors all require her use of a portable laptop. As stated earlier, the one in use is rapidly failing. Your donation to this project will allow the continued functioning of this essential clerical element of LRFF. 

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Mar 2, 2011

A Vital Biological Corridor

Black and white beetle near Chocuaco
Black and white beetle near Chocuaco's farm

LRFF’s credibility continues to grow in the local community as projects are funded and local land owners receive their Payments for Environmental Services (PES). It may be difficult for some of us to imagine the difference these payments of $300 per hectare per year can make for local Costa Rican families. It can be the difference of being able to afford school uniforms and books, or of having the money to pay for medical care, or even of being able to put more than a simple meal of beans and rice on the table. Further, these PES’s make it possible for local farmers to reforest a portion of their land and witness the wealth of wildlife that returns when biological corridors are created. This is no small thing. We are helping increase awareness of the interconnectedness between the people of this community and their natural environment. Each project we complete becomes one more example of what’s possible.

Ana loves the jungles of Costa Rica and the wildlife that thrive in them. But since her husband’s death last year, she also has the full responsibility of taking care of her family financially. Her family has resisted selling out to developers when neighbors on either side of her did just that. She waits in eager anticipation for the funding that will bring about the completion of this project - creating a new biological corridor that will allow wildlife access to a broader range of habitat. Your support is crucial to making that happen.

Links:

Mar 2, 2011

Indigenous Memories

Preying Mantis
Preying Mantis

January brought us exciting news, a large donation of $1900 was made to this project leaving only $1373 for its completion. It’s my sincere hope that we will reach that goal in the next few months. I’ve promised my grand-nieces and nephews a trip to this site when they come visit me in Costa Rica. I want to show them this very specific example of what their gift donations make possible. For while the Lopez family takes seriously their role of being guardians both of the forest around them and of the ancient petroglyphs on the cliffs along the stream bed, what’s also true is that currently the road into their property has become nearly impassable. The Lopez family’s Payments for Environmental Services (PES) associated with this project will make it possible for them  to repair their road. This in turn will give more people the opportunity to visit the beautiful petroglyphs here as well as the chance to become aware of the many benefits arising out of preserving native forested areas. Won’t you help us complete this project? We can’t do it without you.

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