WomensTrust, Inc.

Our mission is to empower women and girls in Ghana through microenterprise development, education, and healthcare and to inspire others to do the same elsewhere. Microloans support self-sufficiency, job creation, and community development. Microlending and educational scholarships for girls in Pokuase, Nsawam and other low-income communities in Ghana are the foundations of our success. Our microloans help women to develop stable incomes, and our scholarships help keep girls in school so that they may complete their education and have more career and life options.
Dec 11, 2012

WomensTrust Opens Office in Nsawam

Palm oil seller Adua, new loan client in Nsawam
Palm oil seller Adua, new loan client in Nsawam

WomensTrust is expanding our microfinance and education programs into new communities that will allow us to help empower thousands more impoverished women and girls in Ghana to build better futures for themselves and their families.

In December of 2012, we extended our microloan programs to women in Nsawam, a vibrant trading center of 120,000 people located about 10 miles north of Pokuase, the village where WomensTrust maintains its main office. WomensTrust has opened an office in the community and will hire two new employees to administer our programs there.

Currently, WomensTrust has more than 700 active microloan clients, and has awarded over 800 scholarships to keep girls in school.

Nsawam loan client, Gifty, sews school uniforms
Nsawam loan client, Gifty, sews school uniforms
Loan client Janet sells tomatoes in Nsawam market
Loan client Janet sells tomatoes in Nsawam market

Links:

Jul 17, 2012

Empowering Rural Women

Every February thousands of women gather together in New York City to explore the critical issues facing women globally. Thanks to a sponsorship from Anglican Women’s Empowerment (AWE), I traveled from my home in Pokuase to New York to speak on a panel at this year’s gathering, the 56thSession of the United Nations’ Conference on the Status of Women. The event confirmed for me that women’s empowerment is not a destination but a lifelong journey. 

This year’s conference focused on rural women and their role in eradicating poverty and hunger across the globe. Being born a woman in a rural village automatically puts a lot of obstacles in your path. But I’m certainly not alone on the journey. I was able to personally meet with women leaders like US Ambassador to the UN Susan Rice; Melanne Verveer, UN Ambassador at Large for global women’s issues; Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Leymah Gbowee; and Pan-African Women Parliamentarians’ President Gertrude Mogela. I returned to Pokuase inspired and ready to work harder than ever in solidarity with other rural women. I thank the AWE – and all its sponsors and supporters – for making the dream of this rural woman come true. 

Links:

May 1, 2012

What Girls Want, By US Board Member Jeanie B.

Students in the Computer Training Classroom
Students in the Computer Training Classroom

Sophia. Patience. Gifty. Beatrice. Grace. Forgive.  They are among about two dozen girls who gather each afternoon during the week in a makeshift classroom in Pokuase, where they spend the next two hours learning about computers. 

The class is a program of WomensTrust, whose mission in part is to empower impoverished girls in Ghana through educational scholarships to help them stay in school, and extracurricular classes like health education and computer training. The computer class was first offered in 2009, through a generous donation that allowed WomensTrust to purchase 20 PC laptops and hire a local instructor. Since then more than 100 girls have received computer training--girls who otherwise would have no exposure to what we take for granted as a staple of modern life. Most public schools in Ghana can't afford computer labs, and though cell phones and ipads seem ubiquitous, these gadgets are still out of reach for many families, especially those in rural villages like Pokuase.

One recent afternoon I drop by the office of WomensTrust just as the computer class, which is conducted in an adjoining room, is getting underway. The girls, ranging in age from 9 to 16, come straight from school, still dressed in their uniforms that identify their grade and where they attend -- green dresses with yellow sashes or brown jumpers with yellow shirts for the grade schoolers, yellow shifts with blue or white trim for the junior high and high schoolers. They wear their hair closely cropped; school dress codes are strict and prohibit the elaborate plaited styles that are so popular here. 

The girls sit quietly. A few have open books perched in their laps; others jot notes in notebooks. Their teacher, Dominic Osei, and a few of the girls make several trips carrying in a dozen laptops from the storeroom, and set them up in two rows on the long table. The girls take turns sitting in front of the screens, hands poised over the keyboard as Dominic guides them through the basics: turning on the computer, creating a password, logging in. 

The girls are rapt and completely engaged--the kind of students every teacher hopes for. But there are other challenges. Power outages occur on a daily basis; sometimes there is no electricity for hours at a time, and computer batteries have a short lifespan. There are only 20 computers for 24 girls; and the waiting list for the class is long, since it's open to all girls who receive a scholarship from WomensTrust, more than 700 to date. And the computers themselves are more than 3 years old now--senior citizen status in computer-time. 

Want to make a difference you can witness with your own eyes? Make a donation to WomensTrust to support its computer-training program for girls in Pokuase.

Links:

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $25
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $200
    give
  • $250
    give
  • $350
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $200
    each month
    give
  • $250
    each month
    give
  • $350
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of WomensTrust, Inc.

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about WomensTrust, Inc. on GreatNonProfits.org.