Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Our mission is to improving the health, education and food security of families in Indigenous and rural communities in Latin America. We seek to strengthen vulnerable families by serving women and children, with an emphasis on Indigenous peoples in the Lake Atitlan region of Guatemala and other rural, coffee-growing communities in Latin America through integrated, school-based health & education programs. Pueblo a Pueblo was founded on the belief that meaningful and sustainable change requires the commitment and active involvement of the individual, community or organization that will benefit from that change. Pueblo a Pueblo strives to deepen values such as personal responsibility, se...
Jan 21, 2015

Increasing Our Impact and Saving Lives

Every second Wednesday of the month, laughter spills out of the Pueblo a Pueblo courtyard and travels through the office displaying the excitement and energy of women as they meet to learn more about healthy pregnancies and child development. In October, Pueblo a Pueblo’s Maternal Child Health meetings became not only louder, but much livelier when seventeen new expectant mothers joined our existing group.

In order to reach those women who are most in need, new beneficiaries are selected from criteria that make them ideal candidates for our program. First, they all come from rural communities where health care services are rare and poverty rates are high. They’re also young, with an average age of 24. Most importantly, they are all pregnant when they join the program, many for the first time.

Thanks to your generous support, these women receive the life-saving education and medical attention they need to ensure a healthy delivery for their newborn babies. 

One of the women we support is Antonia.  Prior to joining the group in October, Antonia’s pregnancy was labeled as high risk.  With a history of one miscarriage and a diagnosis of diabetes, she was in need of constant prenatal attention. 

Right after joining Pueblo a Pueblo’s Maternal Child Health program, Antonia suffered from early hemorrhaging in her last trimester. Using what she learned in one of our monthly meetings, Antonia recognized that she was experiencing the warning signs associated with a possible miscarriage. Due to the access to medical care that our program provides, doctors were able to stop the bleeding and save her unborn child.  Since then Antonia has been provided with prenatal vitamins and free medical appointments to ensure that the remainder of her pregnancy is a healthy one.  She now feels better and looks forward to giving birth in April.

In the span of only three months, Antonia’s life has changed. Her unborn child was saved and her health improved. Being poor and from a rural area lacking in medical services, Antonia will now receive the education and care that was previously unavailable to her. 

We are proud to be expanding our reach to provide the support that mothers like Antonia need and we look forward to increasing our impact in the coming year.   

Jan 20, 2015

Experiences of an Organic School Gardens Educator

Since 2011, Elder Archila has been an educator for Pueblo a Pueblo’s Organic School Gardens project, a sister-project of School Lunches. A normal workday for our garden educators consists of teaching lessons on organic agriculture and the importance of a well-balanced diet to primary school-aged children in multiple public elementary schools. As our local staff come from traditional Mayan families themselves, one of the unique skills Elder brings to his work is educating schoolchildren on traditional Mayan agricultural practices. Elder loves his job and enjoys positively contributing to children’s education by sharing his passion for organic gardening. 

From his perspective, many indigenous, coffee-farming communities lack proper nutrition as well as education on healthy eating habits.

Though this is the reality, Elder has seen many positive changes in the past four years. For instance, students who have participated in this project eat more fruit now than they did before. They also gained interest and knowledge on organic agriculture, planting techniques, and the benefits of growing and eating diverse foods. With each additional year, Elder sees that the students get more and more excited when planting season begins and they take more pride in their annual harvest.

In the schools, Elder works alongside many teachers to make these classes possible. While the vast majority of teachers are supportive and encouraging, he mentioned that there are a few who do not see the importance of organic gardens in their schools. Elder is looking forward to another year of teaching organic gardening to local students, but more importantly, he hopes to gain deeper support and understanding from his partners.

Dec 23, 2014

A Change in Chacaya

It’s coffee season in Guatemala, which means children from our partner communities are spending their days hiking through the dense thickets of red coffee berries that cover the country’s rural landscape.

But in San Antonio Chacaya – a nearby community known principally for the quality of its coffee – this year’s harvest was slightly different.

Instead of heading straight for the fields, children in Chacaya this year were given permission to start their mornings at a summer literacy camp led by four local volunteers and co-hosted by Pueblo a Pueblo at the community’s primary school. For the first time ever, the project’s summer camps were over-enrolled!

For four hours each morning, fifty children between the ages of six and twelve worked to improve their reading and writing skills through activities ranging from skits and plays to arts and crafts. All activities were designed to develop students’ reading fluency, attention span, and creativity, among other skills essential for success in the classroom. 

In addition to a successful camp session, we were proud to see parents and community leaders make a conscious effort to put their children’s education first. Through its support of the school’s literacy camps, the Chacaya community made it clear to its children that education and participation in the household economy aren’t mutually exclusive priorities, but rather complementary parts of long-term strategy to improve life in the community. 

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