Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Our mission is to improving the health, education and food security of families in Indigenous and rural communities in Latin America. We seek to strengthen vulnerable families by serving women and children, with an emphasis on Indigenous peoples in the Lake Atitlan region of Guatemala and other rural, coffee-growing communities in Latin America through integrated, school-based health & education programs. Pueblo a Pueblo was founded on the belief that meaningful and sustainable change requires the commitment and active involvement of the individual, community or organization that will benefit from that change. Pueblo a Pueblo strives to deepen values such as personal responsibility, se...
Jun 27, 2012

Healthy Children: A Gift for Mothers

Children at the La Cumbre Elementary School actively participate in Pueblo a Pueblo’s WASH program all year around. But what about their parents?

Inspired by the trainings they received from Pueblo a Pueblo, teachers organized its first hygiene class for parents on the day before Mother’s Day and invited Pueblo a Pueblo to participate. Forty-one mothers packed into a school room to learn about topics such as proper hand washing techniques, the importance of personal hygiene and sending kids to school clean, healthy foods, values, and discipline. Three mothers chosen in advance to lead the discussion also talked about the importance of monitoring children’s free time in order to avoid problem behaviors such as drug and alcohol use.  Three teachers, Gaspar Boron Icaj, Francisco Cutzal Pop, and Josefa Virginia Boron, also spoke, supporting the mothers’ messages and talking about the classification and reuse of waste. In honor of Mother’s Day, the eldest mothers in the group were given small gifts and asked to say a few words about important values to teach children, such as respect, responsibility, prudence, honesty, and cooperation.

 

Also in May, Pueblo a Pueblo made its first monitoring visit to the Tzan Chaj School to inspect the bathrooms and observe hygiene behaviors. Rosario Ixbalan, a fourth grade teacher and the school’s Environmental Committee representative, answered questions about the WASH project. “What most motivates me is that the students are practicing these behaviors,” she said. “They will remind each other when one of them forgets to wash their hands or brush their teeth and they even remind me when I forget to do our daily hygiene inspection.”  Rosario added that she feels the steps for how to teach children to correctly brush their teeth has been the most helpful part of the WASH training she received from Pueblo a Pueblo.

Jun 27, 2012

Fruits, veggies and herbs..oh my!

It’s the middle of the school year in Guatemala, and Pueblo a Pueblo continues to bring hot nutritious meals to 6 schools in the Santiago Atitlan region.  That’s more than 1,150 primary school children that are getting nourishing meals!

The School Lunch project is an integral part of the School Health and Nutrition Program’s efforts to address food security and malnutrition, and impart sustainable gardening techniques to children and their families.  By nourishing the children’s bodies and minds, we aim to positively impact their quality of life, as well as that of the communities.

The School Lunch and Organic School Garden projects work hand-in-hand to teach students how to plant and harvest the healthy foods they eat during lunch.  Our school gardens are flourishing, with over 50 edible varieties of fruits, vegetables and herbs planted!  Students, teachers along with Pueblo a Pueblo staff enjoy picking the fruits of their labor to supplement the nourishing meals served in the schools.  Supported by a strong group of mothers who donate their time to cook delicious lunches for the students, vegetables such as beets, carrots and varieties of leafy greens are used to make healthy salads; while assorted peppers, tomatoes and onions are used to flavor warm and hearty soups.

Through this integrated experience, students learn the important connection between sustainable gardening, nutritious and balanced diet, and their well-being.  Healthy, well-fed children make happy and attentive students, allowing them to realize their full potential at school!

May 22, 2012

A Special Mother's Day

The Maternal Child Health Program celebrated Mother´s Day this month along with some exciting activities. We had a high turn-out at our educational seminars this month with a few of the fathers in attendance as well, one of them for the first time. The topic we presented at the May seminar included family planning methods: Depo-Provera, Cyclofem, and contraceptive pills. The women asked questions and participated in active discussions throughout the class.

 After the meeting, we had packages of baby clothes and shoes to give out to the mothers, who were all very thankful to receive them. Additionally, a local dental intern provided complimentary fluoride treatments for each woman, a first time for many of them.  

In the coming month, Pueblo a Pueblo will be welcoming a volunteer group of undergraduate students to Santiago, Atitlan. This group has raised enough money to purchase and install 10 Onil stoves for the mothers of our Maternal Child Health Program. In rural Guatemala, many women cook food for their families using fire pits that are placed on top of a dirt floor in their one-room house. The frequent exposure to open fire stoves in poorly ventilated areas leads to acute and chronic respiratory disease, lung malignancies, eye diseases, burns, low birth weight, and infant mortality. According to the World Health Organization, excessive smoke inhalation is the leading cause of death for children under five in Guatemala. The steel chimney that comes with each stove will be channel pollutants away from the house. Furthermore, the insulated cement stoves burn significantly less wood, which will help ease deforestation, while also saving money for each household.

 In preparation for this project, one of the Pueblo a Pueblo volunteers, Abby Levin, has been going on home visits with our local health educator, Chonita Ramirez, to select the women to receive an Onil stove. Since we cannot provide stoves for everyone this time around, the criteria for receiving a stove is based on home ownership, level of participation in the program, and need (variables for this factor include: the lack of a current stove with chimney, proximity of open-fire stove to the bedroom of the family, number of people who use stove to gauge amount of smoke produced.) We look forward to partnering with more groups in the future to continue providing these valuable resources as they are much needed, and extremely appreciated.

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
  • $25
  • $50
  • $75
  • $100
  • $200
  • $500
  • $10
    each month
  • $25
    each month
  • $50
    each month
  • $75
    each month
  • $100
    each month
  • $200
    each month
  • $500
    each month
  • $
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc.

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Pueblo a Pueblo, Inc. on GreatNonProfits.org.