Hope Ofiriha

We empower women and children living in rural communities to overcome social injustice, disease, illiteracy, and poverty. Our small-scale interventions enhance their social and economic well being and help them reach their potential.
Oct 10, 2011

Impoverished South Sudanese Children in Uganda

Saterina Lakang - sponsored pupil
Saterina Lakang - sponsored pupil

Impoverished children often become slaves to their new “families.” Some, especially the girls, are sexually or physically abused, and all of them are expected to work hard.

Polly’s story is unique. Infact, it is common among the South Sudanese refugee families living as squatters in slums in the outskirts of Kampala, Uganda. More than 1000 children, most of them girls, have become “impoverished children” or “Independent orphan children”.

Their parents, too poor to feed, and educate their children, send them to live with families in better economic situations, much as Margaret’s did in recent months, hoping they’ll receive a better life and even an education. But often their children become slaves to the new “families.” Some, especially girls, are sexually or physically abused, and all of them are expected to work hard. They are the first to rise in the morning and the last to go to sleep at night – sometimes on a scrap of cardboard outside, like a dog.

They must cook breakfast for the family, clean the house, and help with the children. Several times a day they have to fetch fresh water for the family, a task that can take hours. Little girls and boys balancing jugs of water almost as large as they can be seen walking down the dusty streets of on the outskirt of Kampala. Their salaries are food and a place to sleep.

The host families, not wanting to spend money on these impoverished children, don’t let them go to school. In Uganda, even “free” public school costs money since there fees for books and uniforms each year. Without an education these children grow up illiterate and virtually unemployable, with no hope of changing their situation. Instead they must continue living as slaves or run away to escape the abusive treatment. Those who run away have nowhere to turn, especially since they have no skills to secure a job and cannot even read or write. They are forced to live on the streets where they continue to suffer abuse and hardship. Mange depends on the kindness of strangers to get food, while others resort to stealing. Some grown up girls are even forced to grant sexual favors in exchange for food.

Without help, these children are doomed to a life of poverty and sadness. But there is hope, and it begins with providing these impoverished children an education that will help break the vicious cycle of poverty that dominates their lives.

Our partner Inovati has paid a year school fees for: Margaret N. Achan, Polly Amitto, Christine Anyero, Lee Ben Ibo, and Saterina Lakang. Hope Ofiriha is also committed to paying the school fees for the children already in the program.


 

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Oct 10, 2011

September; Field progress report

Grace Amullo - new beneficiary
Grace Amullo - new beneficiary

$50 - helps a woman to start income generating business in Uganda!

Our supporters donated over $6000 toward the budget of $50,000. We are operating on a small budget goal of $1000. This policy is good for Hope Ofiriha and for our supporters.

September 14; Grace Akullu, 32 year old, single mother did not know what another ways she was going to support her three (3) children. She was forced to move to Kampala from nearby town of Bweyele – previously “the Sudanese Refugees resettlement Centre” to escape cycle of poverty.

After she moved to stay with Laura Iteng (her grandmother), who is living on the outskirt of Kampala, Grace became discouraged due to lack of opportunities.

A friend, who is a successful microloan beneficiary herself, asked Grace attends “How to start small business” training workshop designed to teacher Sudanese Refugee women how to diversify their businesses. The training workshop focuses on how to select good business sector, profit mark-up and book-keeping (recording of cash in and out).

After training the microloan Group decided to give her start-up money. With Ugsh.150, 000 ($50), Grace is selling charcoal in Kajjansji and is diversifying further. Today Grace spends nearly $12 a day and receives in $15 and $18 a day, more than 25% profit!

Previous borrowers are doing well in their businesses respectively. The project is doing well and women are happy.

We still need your help to put the finishing touches on this project so we can help more women get out of poverty.

Thanks to our donors! Thanks to GlobalGiving for sharing our project with kind people! Without YOU - Hope Ofiriha would have not helped these women.

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Oct 4, 2011

Combating poverty through education

Astrid & Lunde - we are returning to Omilling!
Astrid & Lunde - we are returning to Omilling!

Omilling's former child-soldier problem is a complicated one!

Astrid Wang and Lunde Arneberg from the Oslo School of Architecture & Design are returning to Omilling to construct Mario primary school in November. The plan A – is to build one classroom, girl-pit latrine, and a teacher’s house. They are busy re-designing the school’s structure to match village’s standard.

Fighting against decades of marginalization and intense state of poverty that spawn the practice, it is sometimes hard to imagine there is a way to help. Funding school building may seem like a small thing to do when thousands of children are living in such a hard conditions, but this school provide more than an education. It provides hope, dignity, and a sense of well-being. But most of all, it brings the new-beginning into the lives of these precious former child-soldiers.

Hundreds of former child-soldiers find hope in the fact that they attend school each week. For many it is their escape from a harsh reality. They are getting an education that will help them get a job one day and keep them from being marginalized.

Ten in 10 girls in Omilling cannot read and write. And only one out of 300 girls in Omilling is at Juba University.

Omilling builds a school for the first time in the village’s history. But they lack the building materials. Could you consider helping to build Mairo primary school?

What will you give?

Hope Ofiriha has purchased15 additional bags of cement with the funding you donated.  These cements are in the store.

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