Sydney Wildlife

Our mission is to rescue, rehabilitate and release Australian native animals, and to educate the community, at all levels, about the need to protect our native animals and to preserve their habitats.
Jul 27, 2015

Breaking down the barriers

Global Giving Representatives with Diamond Python
Global Giving Representatives with Diamond Python

We were recently lucky enough to be visited by Alex and Amanda from Global Giving in the USA at our rehabilitation facility at Waratah Park.  

During their visit, we were able to get a better understanding of how Sydney Wildlife can benefit from the partnership we have with Global Giving and the many services and tools available for us to use.  They provided great feedback on how other organisations have benefited from their alliance with Global Giving which has given us a few new ideas that we are presently looking into. We are also pleased to report that our project is performing extremely well with a very high rating of interaction both via the Global Giving website and also via our regular project reports.

Whilst we were able to learn a lot from Amanda and Alex, we were also able to teach them about Australia's native wildlife.  

They were brave enough to visit our rehabiliation facility during a corporate working bee on a cold and wet Friday morning.  They were given a tour of our facilities and were able to get up close and personal with some of our education animals breaking down the barrier between reptile and human.

We would like to thank Alex and Amanda for their continued help and advice.

Stay tuned for our next report and prepare to be amazed as work continues on our facilities

Pythons tongue
Pythons tongue
Injured Blue Tongue Lizard
Injured Blue Tongue Lizard
Brush Tail Possums
Brush Tail Possums
Cloudy Educating Volunteers
Cloudy Educating Volunteers
Jun 5, 2015

One step back, two giant leaps forward

Volunteer showing leaning fence after storm
Volunteer showing leaning fence after storm

In April, Sydney was rocked by the worst storms we have had in a decade with cyclonic winds and rain which wreaked havoc on Waratah Park and our rehabilitation enclosures.  We had multiple trees come down, fence poles snapped, shelters blown over and flooding.  Within a week of the storms passing and damage being done, we held a working bee at the park to get everything back up and running again. 

With the help of our wonderful corporate volunteers, in one day, we were able to mend the damage done by the storms.  This included:

  • The fencing around the macropod enclosure was reinforced with additional posts put up.  
  • Due to the high winds, the shade cloth that provides a visual barrier for the macropods needed to be replaced around the boundary fences.  
  • The macropod shelters that were blown over were relocated, reinforced and reinstated.  
  • Multiple trees had to be chainsawed into managable pieces and were either removed or used in the exising enclosures to replicate natural habitates.
  • We set up a turtle enclosure to house a resident turtle of the park that had a cracked shell from a fallen tree during the storms.  After treatment and shell repair, it is now doing very well in it's new enclosure prior to being released.

Thanks to all the wonderful help from the volunteers, the park is now sturdier than before the storms hit.

We are working to quickly build some additional facilities so we can rehabilitate other species and give them the best chance in the wild once released like we have been able to do for the macropods. 

It's your help and donations that enable us to be able to build and maintain these facilities and for that we are extremely grateful. 

Shelters blown over in the Macropod enclosure
Shelters blown over in the Macropod enclosure
Tree fallen over pathway and fence
Tree fallen over pathway and fence
Pathway after volunteers removed tree
Pathway after volunteers removed tree
Cloudy supervising the fence repairs
Cloudy supervising the fence repairs
May 18, 2015

Will, Jada and Billy

Will and Jada when they first arrived
Will and Jada when they first arrived

Hello everyone!

Things are cooling down here now, and it's easy to forget the drama of the heat stress event late last year.

Attentive readers might remember that we helped look after some of the orphans from Casino, north of Sydney, because the local carers were over whelmed. The bats there are a different species, Pteropus alecto rather than the Pteropus poliocephalus we usually get in Sydney. This year, between the 2 species we put 100 baby bats through the facility- all of them using the lovely new cage. Of these, 62 were alectos, and 38 polios.

Most of us are much more familiar with the grey-headed flying foxes (poliocephalus) so this time I thought we'd tell the story of two alectos, Will and Jada. They were brought down by Tiere and Sarah, who did an emergency run to bring down some orphans to Sydney. You can see them wrapped up as bat burritos below. Very cute with much denser fur than our Sydney bats, they look like black velet.You can see the difference between them in the second photo, Billy is a grey headed one. But they all learn to hang on a laundry dryer, little by little until they develop their muscles. Eventually they start learning to fly too, and that's when they get moved into the new cage, so they can get a bit of space to develop their flying skills.

Usually we release from the cage to the local colony, but there isn't a colony of alectos near by so Jada and Will were taken back north and released at their home colony. Studies show that home raised bats have an excellent rate of survival when released, so we hope they are getting stronger and that soon they will be having pups of their own.

It's a lot of work raising orphan pups, and heat stress events are very traumatic. But when you are able to rescue and successfully release babies like Will and Jada you realise that it is all worth while. Some flying fox species (like our beloved poliocephalus) are ecologically vulnerable, and its so important that we are able to support them to survive.

Carers do part of the work its support like yours that makes it all possible.

Will, Jada and Billy, and the other 97 orphans we put through the facility in the last few months say thank you.
Now they are all in the wild, the cage is being used to help adult flying foxes, who have been brought in injured, mostly after being caught in garden netting. We will talk about them next time.

Same bat time, same bat channel.... stay tuned.

Will, Jada and Billy hanging out together
Will, Jada and Billy hanging out together

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