Child Rights and You

To enable people to take responsibility for the situation of the deprived Indian child and so motivate them to seek resolution through individual and collective action thereby enabling children to realise their full potential. And people to discover their potential for action and change. To enable peoples' collectives and movements encompassing diverse segments, to pledge their particular strengths, working in partnership to secure, protect and honour the rights of India's children.
Feb 27, 2015

Stories of Hope

Name of Child : Anant
Location : Ramanathapuram district, Tamil Nadu, India

Anant just completed his 9th standard and is looking forward to continuing his studies in the 10th.

But, this was not Anant’s story a while back. In the Pudugramam village of Tamil Nadu’s Ramanathapuram district, 14-year-old Anant* was usually at work before most of the inhabitants of his village are even awake. Each day he began work as a cleaner of farm tractors, then went on to drive the vehicles. He earned a measly Rs. 150/- for a full day’s work. Anant’s friends were his colleagues and the labourers who hired his services – not peers or school mates whose company he missed.

Anant was forced to drop out of school last year because his family couldn’t afford to pay the school fees to educate him beyond the 8th standard. The state-aided Naripayur Bharatha Matha High School where he studied was charging school fees of Rs. 600 to Rs.1000 from the 6th standard onwards. Anant’s family lives in extreme poverty as his father is unable to work due to an illness; Anant’s 19-year-old brother works as a construction helper and is the sole breadwinner for the family. There is no government school near his village.


Anant is an example of the thousands of children who are pushed into child labour once they finish their free schooling under the RTE Act. With no money to pay for higher education, and not enough qualifications to garner decent jobs, these children who fall outside the purview of the RTE Act often end up working in jobs where they are prone to exploitation and abuse.

CRY-supported NGO Rural Workers Development Society (RWDS) works in the area and was alerted to Anant’s case. The community worker worked with Anant and his family. Through efforts , Anant is now enrolled in the Government Higher Secondary School in Kannirajapuram where he has just completed his 9th standard and is looking forward to continuing his studies in the 10th.


Name of Child :Divya's Story
Location: Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India

Divya from Kusumnagar in Jamshedpur, is now studying in the 9th standard at the Tata Workers’ Union High School in Kadma. While she still has the responsibility of taking care of her family, she is adamant to not leave school and continue with her studies.


It was a long journey for Divya to make this decision. Living on the outskirts of Jamshedpur city, she woke up early each morning and rushed to work. With sleep-weary eyes she went to the house where she worked as a domestic help, washed the dishes, clothes, mopped the floors, and ran back home, with barely enough time to prepare for school. After school, she was off to work again.


Divya is no stranger to hard work. The youngest daughter, she was compelled to drop out of school while studying in the fourth standard and start working in order to help support her family’s income. Her father had passed away, leaving the responsibility of providing for the family of six to her elder brother. But it was not enough; Divya was therefore sent to Kashmir to work as a domestic help. She worked there for three years before returning to her family in Jharkhand.


Many children in India are robbed of their childhood and pushed into child labour costing them their precious future. Divya came in contact with the Children’s Group organised by CRY-supported NGO Adarsh Seva Sansthan. With support from her peers and motivation from the community workers, she managed to get re-enrolled in the eighth standard in Bhatiya Basti Secondary School.

Divya is an example of how even in the face of adversities one can sustain a dream. With a little support from us we can give many more children a chance to live their aspirations.

 

Feb 27, 2015

Dribbling away to a happier life

Name of Child: Udaya Kumar ( Name changed to protect the Identity of the child)

Place: SM Nagar, Vyasarpadi, Chennai

 

‘Football can change the character of a person’says Master Thangaraj, Mentor & Coach SCSTEDS football team.

A perfect case in point is Udaya Kumar, a star football player from the slums of Vyasarpadi in Chennai. Udaya Kumar was one of the 5 children, his single mother struggled to raise. Poverty ridden, she worked hard to make ends meet.

Frustrated by his circumstances Udaya began hanging out on the streets with his friends till late night. He quit school when he was12. In a desperate bid to escape from reality he turned to substance abuse and alcohol.

The Change: The situation would probably have gone from bad to worse, had it not been for the timely intervention of the SCSTEDS team. Having realized that sports goes a long way in the development of children, the SCSTEDS team encouraged Udaya to be a part of their football team. After he joined them, he was gradually and gently encouraged to join school. Slowly but steadily he began to show interest in his studies. He also started focussing on his practice sessions and made his way towards the under 18 Tamil Nadu state team!  He further went on to represent India in the Homeless Soccer World Cup held at Sweden in 2011.

He continued his studies and pursued his bachelor’s degree in Visual Communications. Today a hero for the other youngsters at Vyasarpadi, Udaya Kumar is a perfect example that shows the power of sports in moulding a child’s life.

Udaya Kumar's Life Today: Udaya Kumar has recently cleared his service commission exams for the Tamil Nadu Police selection. He is the first youth in the entire slums of Vyasarpadi to get into a Permanent Government job.

Nov 25, 2014

Immunization Campaign Impact REPORT

Immunization Programme is one of the key interventions for protection of children from life threatening conditions, which are preventable. Yet, an estimated 11.6 lakh children die every year within one year of their birth due to lack of immunization.

‘Happy First Birthday’ was a CRY initiative to ensure 42,971 newborn children across CRY supported projects across India to have access to the mandatory vaccination dosages that immunize them from easily preventable diseases and any fatal outcomes. With Your support we have been able to ensure complete immunization of 44,207 newborns. CRY and its partners will continue to work with the parents, communities and public health centers to overcome challenges that stand in the way of children receiving immunization.

 

Case Story 1:

Ansh a nine-month old little boy lives in a rented home with his mother and father in Tejpur, Indore, Madhya Pradesh. His father works as a tailor and mother is a homemaker. Soon after he was born Ansh had only received the BCG vaccination and no other vaccines because he did not have a vaccination card and neither was he enrolled in a nearby Aaganwadi Kendra. CRY along with the project partner Deenbandhu spoke to the mother and shared the importance of immunisation and the different ways to prevent diseases. Through regular interaction the mother understood the benefits immunisation would have on Ansh and was motivated towards regular vaccination.

Ansh was enrolled in an Aaganwadi Kendra so that he could be regularly vaccinated and he also received his vaccination card. After the enrollment in the Kendra, Ansh’s mother was regularly informed about the vaccinations so that she would not miss any cycle. Now, Ansh is getting his regular vaccines, his weight is increasing as per his age and he is perfectly healthy. Your support can ensure many more children like Ansh begin a healthy start to life.

 

Case Story 2:

CRY’s partner Mitwa in Chhattisgarh, has been working on the issue of immunisation in the Bilaspur slums. The project team helps create awareness through meetings and discussions with Mahila Mandal (Women Groups), adolescent girls and Anganwadi workers to ensure 100% immunisation.

One family in the slums did not take their 1-year old son for immunisation. The members of Mahila Mandal identified this family and spoke to the parents to ensure the child receives the required vaccines. During one discussion with the family they found out that the father was against immunisation as the child would get fever post receiving the vaccine.

The Mahila Mandal shared this with the organisation, the team continued to motivate the mother and share benefits of immunisation. Due to continued efforts, the mother agreed to take her son for immunisation without the knowledge of her husband. Today the child is immunised against Measles.

CRY along with Mitwa is building perspective on immunisation and motivating the mothers to come forward and overcome challenges that stand in the way of having their children immunised. Your support can help us give many children a healthy start to life. 

CRY thanks you all for supporting the project.

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