ASHOKA JAPAN

Promote social entrepreneurship to approach the goal of evryone-a-changemaker world.
Mar 3, 2015

NO MORE CRY

She sometimes has workshop for children.
She sometimes has workshop for children.

Dear GlobalGivers,

This is Hiroaki Yabe, Ashoka Japan’s Tohoku Youth Venture Programmatic Leader.

I am very thankful for the support we have received in the past. It has been two years and half since we started this project and we are delightful to inform you that now we have 41 Tohoku Youth Venture teams and individuals who are working for the revival of the Tohoku area that was hit by massive earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

I would like to introduce Makoto Sasaki, one of our Tohoku Youth Ventures who joined our community in May 2014.

My town suffered terribly from the Great East Japan Earthquake. But what made me wonder was, despite our town having experienced multiple tsunamis in the past, why were there so many deaths? We had prevention classes ever since elementary school. However, they were too complex for me at that time. It's the same today. So I decided to take action by teaching children about disaster prevention through fun, illustrated picture books and story cards. During my story-time programs, children never have to sit still quietly - instead, they get to be physically active and use their entire bodies and loud voices. 

I teach in other cities, like Nagoya, Kobe and Sendai. I am always surprised by how much the children actually know.

I: "What will come after earthquake?"

Children: "Tsunami!"

I: "Is it good to go back after running away?"

Children: "NO, NO, NO!!!"

I: "Why?"

Children: "Tsunami is coming! You will be washed away!"

I: "I wanna go back to take my lovely game."

Children: "NO!!!!! NEVER!!!"

I hope to speak to more children. And I learn more and more together.

Ashoka Japan will continue to provide a network to support young entrepreneurs. Your kind support and donations enable them to keep moving forward for the future of the Tohoku, and thus Japan. Thank you again for your support and please look forward to hear more about our work with aspiring young generations in Japan. 

Jul 17, 2014

"Preventing more people from dying due to earthquakes in the future." This is my wish.

Kazuki-Ikumi
Kazuki-Ikumi

Dear Global Givers

This is Hiroaki, Ashoka Japan’s Tohoku Youth Venture Programmatic Leader. 

We have selected 41 teams of Youth Ventures for 2years. I would like to introduce you to two unique youths.

 

 

I am from Wakayama Prefecture. Although large earthquakes are predicted to take place in the region, it is a big problem that people in the region are not very interested in the issue.

After I went to volunteer at areas affected by the earthquake, I tried to discuss with people in my region about the current situation in the devastated areas and showed them photographs. But their responses were that such issues are not very related to them. I felt a strong sense of crisis.

 

In those time, I met with Ikumi Nakazawa who live in Kesennuma and experienced the earthquake. She thought that in order not to render the lives of people who died from the earthquake meaningless, she needed to alert people in other regions of her experience to prevent the same tragedy from being repeated.

 

So I decided to convey the horror of tsunami and earthquake with her and created a plan to heighten the awareness toward prevention of disaster and conducted lectures and workshops in schools in Wakayama Prefecture. By listening form her directly, I thought that students in Wakayama Prefecture will feel more closely related to the issue.

 

What I learned from the experience was that it is very difficult to change people’s mind. No matter how much time you give them, it is meaningless unless every person gets prepared for the prevention of earthquake. Because I do not want my loved ones to die any more, I will continue to work to increase the awareness toward disaster prevention to as many people as possible.

Kesennuma
Kesennuma
Dec 2, 2013

Tohoku High Schooler Shares Her Experience: "Action is a message."

Yuuri, a Tohoku Youth Venturer.
Yuuri, a Tohoku Youth Venturer.

Dear GlobalGivers,

 

This is Hiroaki, Ashoka Japan’s Tohoku Youth Venture Programmatic Leader. Here in Japan,  it is starting to get colder and colder. This is especially so for the Tohoku area (Northeastern Japan) which suffered from the earthquake and tsunami. The cold is taking a toll on victims who live in temporary housing projects. 

 

However, I have some good news. We have recently had some of our teams finish our one-year Tohoku Youth Venture program.  As we continue to cheer them on, we have also welcomed into our program a new Venturer. I am thankful for all of our wonderful supporters and donators who have made this possible.

 

Today, I would like to introduce to you a Youth Venturer who started her activity earlier this year. She is also a victim of the tsunami disaster; her own house was washed away by it. Her name is Yuuri Tabata, a 17-year-old high school student. Please take the time to watch a video of a TV program in which her activity was covered, and to learn further about her “Kataribe” activity below.

 

The video: Fighting forgetting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rT9fFQtDOfo&feature=youtu.be

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

My name is Yuuri. I live in Minamisanriku, Miyagi. Today I will present to you an actual speech that I gave in English.

 

Below is my speech:

 

The disaster on March 11, 2011 left signs of damage in my hometown, Minamisanriku, Miyagi. Because my house was ruined by the tsunami, I was forced to live in a temporary housing project. I have not seen the reconstruction that has been repeatedly promised over the last two years. I started questioning what the adults, who had been promising reconstruction, had actually accomplished. I believed that the adults in charge of addressing the situation would actually get something done, but it soon proved to be just an illusion. However, I noticed one more important thing: like those adults, I had also not taken action yet. That is why I started up "Kataribe" a group of students who tell our experiences concerning the disaster to the young generation.

 

Now, I have activities with "Kataribe" after school and weekends. For example, I talked to students who came to Minamisanriku for a school trip. Some of them cried after hearing my story. I hope they will be the next "Kataribe", telling my story to friends, family, and other people. Sometimes I have a chance to tell my experience to foreigners. Most of them are very surprised because earthquakes and tsunamis are not common to them. Maybe my English is not good, but I believe my story have reached their hearts. Through my activities, the disaster would continue to be told to younger generations.

 

Through these experiences, I have realized one important thing. Anybody can think, but what is important is to take action. You can say "Thank you" anytime. However you can lose your friends, family, and lover at any moment. You should think and then take action so that you will not regret later. The young will create the future and make this country better. You should think and then take action. These steps will change you, people around you, and even the world.

 

Action is a message.

 

 

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