The Red Thread Promise

The Red Thread Promise is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to bringing hope and healing to needy and orphaned children.
Jun 11, 2013

Empowering People With Disabilities

Robert outside his home in Haiti
Robert outside his home in Haiti

Recently, we were approached by GOOD Magazine to be featured in their publication dedicated to mobility issues. The article below about our International Mobility Program—providing all terrain wheelchairs to people in need—just hit the internet earlier this week. Below is the article that was published.

Empowering People With Disabilities

Robert was an accomplished welder and farmer in Gramothe, Haiti before 2010. He is married and has two sons, one of which hopes to become an engineer. However, Robert has a progressive condition that is causing him to lose the ability to use his legs. He has been immobile for quite some time and the doctor has not given him a prognosis.

In Haiti, the streets are uneven and bumpy, rendering “hospital-style” wheelchairs virtually useless. In the mountains, where Robert and the majority of Haitians live, dirt roads and rocky footpaths are common. However, The Red Thread Promise makes it possible for people like Robert to become more independent by providing them with all terrain wheelchairs through our International Mobility Program (IMP). In fact, Robert is hopeful to return to welding since receiving his new wheelchair.

During our first trip to Haiti in 2009, we had no intention of starting IMP. But when we observed that hospital-style wheelchairs were not meeting the needs of those using them, it compelled us to seek out the best all terrain wheelchairs available. We worked directly with a manufacturer to keep costs low while providing quality chairs specifically designed and built to traverse rugged terrain. Our chairs feature strong frames, flexible suspension, and wide front wheels especially for sand, rock and uneven surfaces.

In June 2011, we delivered a full shipment of 100 wheelchairs to St. Vincent’s Center for Handicapped Children in Port-au-Prince. Our team worked directly with the center to identify candidates for distribution, assemble the chairs, and provide maintenance training to our Haitian partners. Now, The Red Thread Promise is working to bring mobility to 100 additional people in and around Port-au-Prince as well as local businesses and hotels that are not accessible.

These gifts of mobility give people with disabilities (PWDs) more opportunities to fully engage in life. They promote better self and family care, and help recipients actively participate in educational and economic opportunities. Children can attend school with their peers, acquiring life skills that help them become independent adults. Teens and adults are better able to engage in meaningful work, providing financial stability to their families. Independence increases each individual’s sense of self-worth and self-respect in their home countries.

Ultimately, our goal is to bring communities together, where everyone is viewed with dignity. We not only provide wheelchairs for individuals in need, but also model respectful and inclusive behavior toward people with disabilities. The Red Thread Promise actively discusses discrimination issues with Haitian businesses, governmental entities and other NGOs working in Haiti, encouraging the implementation of anti-discrimination strategies in Haitian society since 2009. Fortunately, on March 13, 2012, the Haitian Senate passed the Law on the Integration of Disabled Persons, which was the first of its kind in the country.

In July 2013, we will be bringing 50 PWDs to a beach resort in Montrious, Haiti for summer camp. Our team has been working with hotel management to build wheelchair ramps and widen doorways for wheelchair access into all areas of the resort. Management has even requested several of our all terrain wheelchairs for use with future guests.

We will continue to work in Haiti and other countries providing mobility for years to come. However, in order to offer a long-term impact, especially to our current program in Haiti, we’d love your support. Help us empower PWDs by giving them the opportunity to be more mobile and independent.


The steep Haitian mountains
The steep Haitian mountains
Streets of Port-au-Prince
Streets of Port-au-Prince
Yolene
Yolene's old wheelchair
Yolene
Yolene's bright smile in a new chair

Links:

Jun 7, 2013

Gumbo Galore!

Doug and many St. Vincent
Doug and many St. Vincent's sous-chefs!

During our most recent trip to Haiti (May 2013), Tom and Doug brought the ingredients for a traditional New Orleans gumbo to St. Vincent's Center for Handicapped Children. Students and residents of all ages joined the pair in St. Vincent's kitchen prepping chicken, sausage and okra for a dish completely foreign to the kids—one they had never tasted or even heard of. (40 lbs of rice and 35 lbs of meat make for some serious gumbo!) As the gumbo's boil roared, students looked on inquisitively wondering if the rice would be mixed in with the gumbo and, in true Haitian form, speculating if there were enough spices in it!  

Following 4+ hours in the kitchen where temperatures soared to well over 100 degrees F, the gumbo was ready. Thinking their work was complete and they could escape to the cooler air outdoors, Tom and Doug realized they still had to serve 70+ hungry residents, far more than originally anticipated.

Again, the students came to his aide and an assembly line quickly formed. First, the bowls were filled with a heap of rice. Second, each was smothered in piping hot gumbo and sprinkled with filé. Lastly, sliced baguette and butter dollops were added to complete the dish. The finishing touch: ice-cold Tang® and a bit of candy for everyone.

Outside the kitchen, a long line of hungry residents had already formed. Within minutes of being served, the bowls were emptied and the residents returned for more until every bit was devoured.

The old saying, "too many cooks in the kitchen" was given a new meaning during the gumbo cookout. We welcomed each and every helper and were grateful for their assistance in preparing the meal. Every chef was instrumental in the meal's success! 

One of our many goals is to help St. Vincent's become self-sustainable so there is sufficient food for everyone all the time. Currently, staff and students receive beans and rice twice a day; on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays they receive a third portion. This reinforces our efforts to explore sustainable farming initiatives so no student is hungry again.

In the meantime, we will continue to provide meals throughout the year thanks to your generous support.

Tom manning the huge pot of gumbo
Tom manning the huge pot of gumbo
Enough gumbo for 70+ hungry residents
Enough gumbo for 70+ hungry residents
Preparing 40 lbs of rice
Preparing 40 lbs of rice
Passing out candy after the meal
Passing out candy after the meal

Links:

Jun 6, 2013

Meeting Kyle

Kyle and his mother, Kelli
Kyle and his mother, Kelli

Have you ever met someone new, but, after spending a short period of time with them, felt like you’ve known them much longer? That was the experience of the Jacob’s Fund team when they met little Kyle and his family two short weeks ago.

Glenna, Jacob’s Fund Director, and Sonya, TRTP VP, drove to a quiet Cincinnati suburb to meet the newest recipient of a Jacob’s Fund ridership (aka a hippotherapy scholarship). The pair was warmly greeted by Kelli, Kyle’s mom, and welcomed into a very neat, organized home. After learning that both a 6- and 7-year-old live in this space, the ladies were amazed at how tidy everything was! Kelli was quick to explain that keeping a neat home creates a peaceful space for both her son and herself. 

We asked her to explain and tell us more about Kyle. Beaming with love, she proceeded to help us get to know her unique little boy, all the while keeping a watchful eye on her children.

Kyle is an adorable blond haired, blue eyed, 7-year-old with a radiant smile and infectious laugh. He adores music, especially catchy gospel songs performed by the young people on one of his favorite videos. He recognizes and can point to all of his ABCs and 123s as well as his colors, small victories for children much younger than him, but colossal milestones for someone with his challenges. 

At an early age, Kyle was diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), which is characterized by delays in the development of socialization and communication skills, typically noted before 3 years of age. Symptoms may include problems using and understanding language; difficulty relating to people, objects, and events; unusual play with toys and other objects; difficulty with changes in routine or familiar surroundings, and repetitive body movements or behavior patterns. Unusual responses to sensory information, such as loud noises and lights, are also common. (Excerpts from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) 

Kyle also has epilepsy, a seizure disorder that affects the nervous system and is characterized by two or more seizures from an unknown cause. (Paraphrased from Epilepsy.com) In addition, he has hypotonia—low muscle tone—which creates balance issues causing him to fall easily.

Upon understanding that this little man has these conditions, we instantly understood the need to maintain a tidy house. Not only is the house kept in a way to maximize Kyle’s safety, but to honor his internal need for order. He likes chairs to be pushed in, doors to be closed and no clutter. It was evident to us that his parents care deeply about preparing and maintaining the best possible environment for their eldest child.

Now that you’ve met Kyle, maybe you feel like you know him too. Stay tuned for our next report that explains why Jacob’s Fund has taken an interest in this exceptional child!

Links:

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