Center for Amazon Community Ecology

Our Mission: Background Philosophy The Amazon rainforest has the largest concentration of animal and plant life in the world. It is also home to hundreds of indigenous groups and tens of thousands of other people who make their living in the forest. The biggest challenge and opportunity for the Amazon is to transform the vision of development that impacts its water, land, plants, animals and people. The current model promotes the production of mass commodities. The new model needs to focus on sustaining diverse human and other biological communities. One important path to creating a sustainable future for the Amazon is to strengthen its traditional communities. People who have strong c...
Jun 13, 2014

A vision for rosewood oil & rare tree recovery

Robin van Loon and Bora rosewood planting team
Robin van Loon and Bora rosewood planting team

Dear Friend of the Amazon,

I'd like to begin this report with a story about a man named Oscar Flores who we have worked with since the beginning of our project in the Bora native village of Brillo Nuevo in Peru.  Oscar was a young boy when his father brought his family and half a dozen rosewood tree seedlings from the jungle up the Putamayo River near Colombia to a growing Bora native settlement on the Yaguasyacu River in Peru.  Oscar fondly remembers growing up with the pleasant aroma of those trees that his dad planted in front of their new house.   Sixty years later one lone rosewood tree had grown to maturity in the patch of forest that grew back after Oscar moved his own family several miles downriver to the community of Brillo Nuevo. 

In the summer of 2012, Oscar led a CACE team back to this rosewood tree to collect some leaves and branches we could distill to make a trial batch of essential oil.  While it now lay in the domain of a neighboring village, tradition allowed Oscar free rights to use it.  The fragrance of those first oil samples was wonderful, but climbing one tall tree to get branches was cumbersome and it would not produce enough seedlings to create even a small essential oil enterprise in a reasonable amount of time.

We asked all of our partner communities if any of them had rosewood we could collect seeds from, but only one fellow said he knew about one tree in the forest of a friend.  We soon learned that this variety of rosewood was not only uncommon in the Ampiyacu - it had been virtually eradicated throughout the Amazon because generations of harvesters had cut down thousands of trees to make oil from their entire trunks or make fine furniture from its timber.  We knew we could make good quality oil by harvesting a modest amount of leaves and branches; with help we could help reestablish the endangered rosewood tree in the Amazon.        

With support from the Marjorie Grant Whiting Center, CACE collaborated with fellow GlobalGiving organization Camino Verde to bring 900 rosewood seedlings raised in a government nursery to Brillo Nuevo in early 2013.  Five families were selected in a village lottery to plant a share of these in a forest plot under the guidance of CV’s director and reforestation expert Robin van Loon.  Since then CACE has used part of its project funds provided by GlobalGiving donors to monitor the progress of these seedlings every three months with local Bora men.  They have witnessed the challenges that the young trees have faced getting established including intense heat, hungry grasshoppers and an unknown whitish fungus.  This monitoring is now done by the five plot owners so they can receive some compensation for their time weeding and tending the young trees until the survivors grow large enough to sustain a modest harvest of leaves and branches.

Most of these owners including Oscar have been diligent stewards of their young rosewoods.  One fellow whose plot was getting overgrown during long absences from the village has now turned over control of his share to his nephew who has been enthusiastic about the venture from the start. One owner commented to our project manager Yully – “I am excited that these rosewood trees may generate some income for my family in a couple of years.  It’s great that I can now try to enrich the forest around here with these beautiful trees that will be valuable for my life and the lives of my children.”

We have recently bought a stainless steel distiller and Patriot shredder to process copal oil and leaves of other aromatic plants like rosewood.  The still was hand-made by Heart Magic in Oregon and after some bumps along the way, the equipment finally got to Iquitos.  Dealing with the shipper, airline, customs, and customs broker gave us a crash course in the art and frustrations related to international shipping, but these lessons will help us advance from conducting experimental level harvesting and distillations to taking the first steps of creating a small essential oil enterprise with our Ampiyacu native partners and other villages in the region.

I have just arrived in Peru and look forward to getting a lot done in the next seven weeks.  We will set up the distiller in a house in Iquitos that we now share with Project Amazonas – another partner NGO that supports health care and conservation with native and campesino communities in the region.  Robin van Loon from Camino Verde will return to Brillo Nuevo with us to check on the young rosewood trees first hand with the plot owners.  This summer, we hope to begin collecting and processing batches of copal resin from several current and new partner villages.

We also plan to return to the town of Tamshiyacu to partner with a forest farmer to collect and process some leaves and branches from rosewood trees on their land.   These trees were planted twelve years ago in a government project, but they stopped maintaining them for easy leaf harvest when the project was aborted before it reached the commercial stage.  We hope that working with this community will teach us a lot about growing and pruning rosewood trees as well as making and selling its oil abroad.   We will then have solid experience to apply to do similar work with our partners in Brillo Nuevo families once their young rosewood trees reach harvestable size.  The vision beyond that is not to create acres and acres of rosewood plantations.  It is to integrate rosewood trees into the natural flow of traditional Bora agroforestry and in so doing help promote the recovery of this magnificent Amazon native from near extinction.

Thank you for your interest and support for this project.  To donate to it on GlobalGiving, please visit: www.AmazonAlive.net.

Best wishes,

Campbell Plowden

Executive Director - CACE

Separating rosewood oil during distillation
Separating rosewood oil during distillation
New distiller and shredder in Iquitos, Peru
New distiller and shredder in Iquitos, Peru
Carrying rosewood seedlings in canoe to field
Carrying rosewood seedlings in canoe to field
Oscar and Bora team collecting rosewood leaves
Oscar and Bora team collecting rosewood leaves
Measuring rosewood seedling growth at Brillo Nuevo
Measuring rosewood seedling growth at Brillo Nuevo

Links:

Mar 26, 2014

Strengthening artisan skills and cooperation with Ampiyacu native communities (Report #6)

Artisan teambuilding exercise at Pucaurquillo
Artisan teambuilding exercise at Pucaurquillo

Dear GlobalGiving donor,

Thank you very much for your support of the Center for Amazon Community Ecology project to create sustainable livelihoods and conserve rainforests in the northern Peruvian Amazon.  We have our special ways of helping native artisans develop innovative handicrafts and produce fragrant oils from aromatic rainforest trees, but our success also depends on forming partnerships with other groups who share our overall goals of promoting forest conservation and creating sustainable livelihoods in native and campesino communities.

CACE began working early this year with the Science and Education department of The Field Museum of Chicago to implement “Quality of Life Plans” with native communities in the Ampiyacu River region.  The core of this collaboration is co-leading a three-part series of workshops with artisans in Brillo Nuevo and Puca Urquillo.  These experiential sessions will help them develop their personal skills and ability to work together to improve their natural resource management, craft-making and craft selling.  TFM and CACE will also co-produce resource materials for the artisans and lead follow-up activities to implement goals that emerge from the workshops. 

These workshops are off to a good start.  CACE Project Manager Yully Rojas and TFM staff have completed the first and second modules in Brillo Nuevo and Puca Urquillo and will finish module 3 by the end of next month.  Below are the main topics in each workshop.

Module 1: Leadership, Organization and Planning.  This workshop includes team play, identifying how artisans plant and process chambira palm for making handicrafts, and drafting plans for small groups to work together to meet craft production goals. 

Module 2:  Trust, Communication and Control. The workshop goal is to build trust among artisans in the group to promote clear communication so they can improve the management and supply of natural resources used in making crafts, create their own mechanisms to control the quality of crafts, and establish transparency in financial management.

Module 3: Decision Making and Sustainability. The goal of this workshop is to encourage artisans to consider trade-offs and consequences of decisions they make regarding the harvest of chambira and dye plants.  They will elaborate different strategies to create a sustainable supply of these raw materials needed to make and sell handicrafts.

The topics are serious, but the mood of the 15 to 20 women who have participated in each session has been focused and lively.  We’ve often seen our Bora and Murui friends like Camila and Alejandrina engaged in daily chores like weeding their gardens, cooking fish, and weaving bags.  During the workshops, it was great to see them having fun and engaged with each other doing a trust lift, coloring distinct patterns on paper cut-outs of fish, and translating their intimate knowledge of chambira harvesting and weaving into a collective plan to meet an order for handicrafts.

Milda from Puca Urquillo summed up her experience of the workshops.  “I didn’t realize how much I already know about many of these things.  My mother and I have sold candies, meals and crafts from our home for a few years now.  I think our group can get better organized to make better and sell more crafts.

The workshop prompted another artisan, Rosa, to comment, “I’ve been buying most of the chambira fiber I use to weave bags from other villages since we don’t have many of these trees left in my family’s “purma” (fallow farm field). It’s expensive, and the “cogollos” sometimes have little dark blotches on them.   I now think we should replant these here so we can harvest and prepare the “cogollos” (unopened leaf spears) carefully ourselves when we need them.”  

When the workshops are over, CACE and our partner will continue to work with our artisan partners and communities to help them implement the chambira management and cooperative craft production plans they have drawn up in the modules.  One big lesson from these workshops for us has been realizing that our earlier attempt to work with all of the artisans from a large community together was going against the cultural grain.  We hope that mutual trust will grow within the whole group over time, but it’s important for us to recognize that most artisans are most comfortable planting, harvesting, and weaving within their extended family groups.  They are more likely to accept help and feedback from a relative and confidant than someone they may still view as a competitor.       

Please check out our newest video Supporting native artisans of the Peruvian Amazon and photo essays about two important craft plants: Achiote – a dye plant for fiber, food and faces and Sisa (Arrabidaea spp.) plants and chambira fiber dyeing. 

Coming up in next report
New essential oil distiller arrives in Peru

Thank you for your past and continued support.  A few more donations to our project will help us graduate from Leader to Superstar status in the GlobalGiving network.  This will give us more opportunities for strategic partnerships and matching funds to assist our partners in Peru.

Campbell Plowden
Executive Director and Project Leader
Center for Amazon Community Ecology 
Craft design exercise at Puca Urquillo workshop
Craft design exercise at Puca Urquillo workshop
Perfecting skill for twisting chambira palm fiber
Perfecting skill for twisting chambira palm fiber
Trust lift exercise at Puca Urquillo
Trust lift exercise at Puca Urquillo
Identifying stages of craft making and marketing
Identifying stages of craft making and marketing
Cooperative craft making exercise
Cooperative craft making exercise

Links:

Dec 26, 2013

Copal - the ecology of an aromatic Amazon resin and novel essential oil. CACE Report #5

Copal resin montage. Photos by C. Plowden/CACE
Copal resin montage. Photos by C. Plowden/CACE

Dear GlobalGiving donor,

Thank you very much for your support for our project on GlobalGiving.  The main goal of the Center for Amazon Community Ecology is to help people in Amazon native and campesino communities to improve their livelihoods, conserve their forests and enrich their cultural traditions.  We help native artisans develop and sell innovative handicrafts and planted 900 rosewood seedlings to produce fragrant oil from this endangered species in a few years.  CACE’s longest standing effort, however, has been to develop a novel oil from the aromatic resin of copal trees.    

Copal is the common name for more than 40 species of trees in the family Burseraceae in the Amazon and other parts of Latin America.  The best known members of this family are frankincense and myrrh, but New World societies going back to the Mayans also burned copal resin for incense. 

People in Central America make cuts into copal trunks to collect the resin that drips from the wounds.  Forest peoples in the Amazon, however, collect resin lumps from trees that have been attacked by bark-boring weevils and use the sticky material to caulk their wooden boats.  CACE is one of the first groups to explore distilling the resin into fragrant essential oil as a more valuable non-timber forest product that could be a more sustainable source of income than activities like unregulated logging, hunting game animals and cash-crop agriculture that burns forests.          

We began studying the ecology and sustainable harvest of copal in 2006 at Jenaro Herrera on the Ucayali River by measuring how much resin could be collected from 30 species.  Since then we have been monitoring resin recovery and learning how different insects are connected to this little copal resin ecosystem.  (See our video: Use and insect ecology of copal resin in the Peruvian Amazon).

Every few months project manager Angel Raygada and field assistant Italo Melendez visit several hundred study trees in the government run field station and take digital photos of every resin lump.  These observations have given us a rich glimpse into the lives of these fascinating weevils.  Their life cycle begins when a pair mates on a copal tree, and the female places her eggs into tiny holes in the bark.  When a larva hatches and chews into the inner bark to feed, it also cuts through canals carrying resin up and down the trunk.  This resin usually repels attackers, these highly-specialized beetles manipulate the exuding resin into a lump with a chamber that protects them as they mature.

Italo has made and refined a series of traps with wire mesh, old soda bottles and inner tubes to catch adult weevils emerging from their lumps so we can better understand the animals responsible for stimulating resin flow.  Checking these traps three times a week during successive rainy and dry seasons has shown us that it takes two to three years for a resin weevil to fully develop.  As Angel has analyzed thousands of photos, we have learned that different weevils make distinct forms of resin lumps including irregular moonscape blobs, grapefruit size hemispheres, and golf-ball size lumps containing a resin honeycomb.  This work is also letting us know how many years the trees (and weevils) need to rest before resin lumps could be harvested again.

Our study has also shown us that many other insects use copal resin.  Italo spends one day a month observing bees on copal trees to learn how important copal is to these major rainforest pollinators.  He has seen black and striped stingless bees collecting resin to build nests for their colonies in hollow trees, iridescent green and gold orchid bees harvesting copal to make their solitary nests, and bumble-bee sized male “ronsapas” courting females perched on resin lumps.  Syrphid fly larvae sometimes burrow through gooey resin lumps where they feed on microbial spores.  We have also found diverse ants, spiders, millipedes, and scorpions roaming through dry resin lump chambers in search of food or a place to raise their young.  Italo came to us with a savvy knowledge of the forest; working with us has taught him how to record detailed measurements in ways he never learned in his schooling that ended after 8th grade.  

We extended our copal surveys to the village of Brillo Nuevo in 2009.  Since we’ve learned from our studies at Jenaro Herrera that it takes at least five years for resin lumps to recover after all of them are removed, we limited our experimental harvest in the Ampiyacu region to half of the lumps on any tree.  We have now begun our second year of monitoring copal study tree and are pleased to see a good number of new and growing resin lumps on them.  With support for this project through GlobalGiving, many young Bora native men are learning to study their own forest resources with techniques and tools including climbing trees with a harness, collecting leaves with a pole pruner, orienteering with a compass, mapping with a GPS, measuring trees with a diameter tape, and weighing resin lumps with a digital balance.  (See our video: Sustainable harvest and marketing of copal resin in the Peruvian Amazon).

We have distilled samples of resin from both Jenaro Herrera and the Ampiaycu to try and transform copal from a local resource that’s good for caulking boats into an aromatic oil that native communities can sell as a value-added product.  Essential oil buyers have told us that samples from some species have promise in fine fragrances while others may be more attractive in aromatherapy.  This year we plan to analyze resin composition and resin weevil DNA to learn which species of copal and weevils produce the most and best resin and develop a management plan with the community to harvest it commercially.

Our five gallon copper alembique pot has been good for our experimental distillations of small batches of copal resin and rosewood leaves.  We now need to buy a larger stainless steel distiller to process more plant material and increase oil yield with our community level project. We also need to purchase a grinder to chip branches into little pieces that can be efficiently distilled.  Thanks again for supporting this project through GlobalGiving.  Every donation will help us develop a novel and viable new sustainable enterprise for our partners.

Best wishes,

Campbell Plowden

Executive Director and Project Leader
Center for Amazon Community Ecology 
Copal resin lump in sustainability study.  CACE
Copal resin lump in sustainability study. CACE
Collecting copal resin lump from tall tree.  CACE
Collecting copal resin lump from tall tree. CACE
Two weevils and copal resin lumps.  Plowden/CACE
Two weevils and copal resin lumps. Plowden/CACE
Orchid bee collecting copal resin.  Plowden/CACE
Orchid bee collecting copal resin. Plowden/CACE
CACE GPS training with Bora natives. Plowden/CACE
CACE GPS training with Bora natives. Plowden/CACE
Copper alembique distiller. C. Plowden/CACE
Copper alembique distiller. C. Plowden/CACE
Distilling rosewood essential oil. C. Plowden/CACE
Distilling rosewood essential oil. C. Plowden/CACE
Stainless steel distillation unit. Heart Magic
Stainless steel distillation unit. Heart Magic

Links:

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