Maison de la Gare

Maison de la Gare's mission is to achieve integration of the begging talibe street children into formal schooling and productive participation in Senegalese society. Tens of thousands of talibe children beg on the streets of Senegal for 6 to 10 hours each day for their food and for money to give the "teacher" or Marabout who controls them. They live in unconscionable conditions in "daaras", without access to running water, rudimentary hygiene or nurture, often without shelter and subject to severe abuse. Human Rights Watch published a widely distributed description of this situation in 2010, "Off the Backs of the Children". Maison de la Gare is acting with t...
Feb 21, 2014

Excursion to Bango

Bouri explains importance of water, source of life
Bouri explains importance of water, source of life

A step towards a balanced and healthy life

Maison de la Gare works to give the talibé children a better understanding of their environment and of the world beyond their lives in their daaras and on the streets.  Thanks to the support of Maison de la Gare's international partners, excursions are included in the curriculum of the children who come to the organization's center in Saint Louis, and this allows them to feel involved in the broader Senegalese community.  Such excursions are particularly valuable for these children who live in very difficult circumstances and are not able to take charge of their own learning.

In this context Bouri MBodj, a teacher in Maison de la Gare's center, organized a field trip to Bango on the banks of the Senegal River so that the children could experience the amazing diversity of this place that is only a few tens of kilometers from Saint Louis.

For many of these children, this was the first time that they had had such an experience.  Bango is one of the extensions of the Saint Louis region, stretching northward on the right bank of the Senegal River.   The area has been populated over time by the Peulh community, but it is also important for all Senegalese.  The largest military training center in Senegal is in Bango, and half of the country's fruit crop comes from this region.  The Bango region is particularly notable for its biodiversity, reflecting both the close proximity of the Senegal River and the open spaces which have been preserved for natural vegetation and animals such as monkeys, warthogs and hippopotamuses.  Mangrove trees are found along the river, together with the great variety of aquatic species which they harbour.

After completing our visit, we spent time with the children to help them to understand and retain what they had learned about this area and its environment.  They learned the meaning and significance of words and concepts including mangroves, fish nests, riverbed, and degradation of arable areas.  The correct answers which the children gave to Bouri and to Bineta Coly, MDG's nurse who had accompanied them, showed that they had learned well from this experience.

And after the explanations, we took action!  We illustrated the value of nature during a session on tooth brushing - information for example on the type of wood to be used.  There are species around us that can heal the body without a lot of expense, such as the "kad" fruit tree that produces tamarind and of which the wood bleeds a fluid that hardens the enamel of teeth.  Many children took advantage of twigs from this tree to brush their teeth.

At the end of the day, we celebrated with a well-earned lunch break, and all of the children returned to Saint Louis with some positive ideas and a better understanding of the environment that they live in.

It was a wonderful day for children and young people of Maison de la Gare's center!  Please help us with your donations to make more such excursions possible.

A change of scenery to see the mangroves
A change of scenery to see the mangroves
Questions, answers!  What nature can provide.
Questions, answers! What nature can provide.
Time for action in a tooth-brushing session!
Time for action in a tooth-brushing session!
Answering questions from Bineta Coly, MDG nurse
Answering questions from Bineta Coly, MDG nurse
Talibe Kalidou Balde helps prepare the meal
Talibe Kalidou Balde helps prepare the meal
We appreciate our lunch break on the river bank
We appreciate our lunch break on the river bank

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Feb 3, 2014

American Ambassador at Maison de la Gare

Ambassador Lukens touring the MDG center
Ambassador Lukens touring the MDG center

Visit to MDG of the Ambassador of the United States, Lewis Lukens

On Thursday, January 23, 2014, Maison de la Gare was honored to receive the visit of Mr. Lewis Lukens, Ambassador of the United States to Senegal.  Upon his arrival in Senegal, Mr. Lukens was shocked by the situation of begging talibé street children.  To combat this scourge, Mr. Lukens invited other foreign ambassadors to Senegal to discuss this problem with him, and to act.  He subsequently organized a round table with local organizations working for children, including Maison de la Gare, to find with them practical avenues for improving the situation.  Thus, Ambassador Lukens has given himself a second mission in Senegal in addition to his diplomatic role ... to help to improve the lives of the talibé street children.  In this context, he travelled to Saint Louis to visit Maison de la Gare and to see and experience this organization's struggle on behalf of the talibé children.

It was around 5:30 in the afternoon that Mr. Lukens entered the gates of Maison de la Gare's Saint Louis center, accompanied by Ms. Elisabeth El Khodary, his economic, commercial and policy attaché.  He was warmly welcomed to the center by MDG's president, Issa Kouyaté.  The talibé children in the center were amazed to see such an important personage coming to enquire into their lives and situation.  Seeing the intense involvement of the children in their activities, Ambassador Lukens took time to observe them, and then to congratulate them and to chat with  several of them.

Issa then took the ambassador on a tour of the entire center, visiting the administration office, the library, the infirmary, the garden, and the classrooms.  They also visited the location where Maison de la Gare plans to build a transitional residence for talibé children in crisis, where Issa explained this vision for this new initiative. 

After the tour, Mr. Lukens and Issa met and discussed in the center's office, together with Ms. El Khodary, the center's administrator, and two U.S. Peace Corps volunteers stationed in Saint Louis.  The discussions focused on Maison de la Gare's work, its achievements and the challenges which it faces.  The Ambassador reassured us that, despite the limited time remaining to him in his posting in Senegal, he will use his influence at the policy level to change things so that the talibé street children can look forward to a better tomorrow.

Our appreciation to Saint Louis web news journal Ndarinfo for permission to use two of their excellent photographs of the event.

Issa Kouyate in discussion with Ambassador Lukens
Issa Kouyate in discussion with Ambassador Lukens
Talibe children waiting to meet the ambassador
Talibe children waiting to meet the ambassador
Issa presenting his vision for a new crisis center
Issa presenting his vision for a new crisis center
Ambassador Lukens visiting an MDG classroom
Ambassador Lukens visiting an MDG classroom

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Jan 17, 2014

Discovering the Talibes

Talibes intrigued by view through Jack
Talibes intrigued by view through Jack's camera

A photo-essay by Jack Wang

I travelled to Africa on a short vacation, planning to spend one week in Senegal and the other in the Gambia.  A chance meeting with Thaddaeus Lister on the flight changed all that!  Thad had worked as a volunteer with a children's organization in Senegal, and was coming for a return visit.  I was enthralled by his passionate tales of the begging talibé street children and of the work that the organization that he had worked with, Maison de la Gare, is doing with these children in Saint Louis.  Caught up in his tale, I threw my plans to the wind and joined Thad on the five hour drive from Dakar to Saint Louis.

Through Thad, I got to meet the founder of "Maison de la Gare", Issa Kouyaté.  I followed Issa closely to document his daily routine, share his struggle over the lack of funding to build and supply a better centre for the talibés kids, and witness his kindness in providing his own home as a safe shelter for talibé children who had run away from their daaras.  As a result after spending ten days with him, I have dedicated my "Talibés" photo-album to Issa Kouyaté, an honourable man who dedicates his life selflessly and relentlessly in pursuit of a better quality of living for the talibés and those around him.

Maison de la Gare is a non-governmental not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping the talibés.  The word "talibé" describes students, always boys, who are studying the Koran and begging for a living.  Getting to know these children has been an eye-opening and heartbreaking experience for me.  This is not a show-case orphanage such as I have seen in eastern Africa!  The talibé children live in daaras, "schools" where the marabout teaches them the Koran.  Often, poor families send their sons to a daara to study the Koran.  Being a "talibé" is a life-long title, and it is considered a mark of honour.  Normally, a daara is named after its marabout.  In a photo below, Marabout Seck is instructing one of his students in Daara Serigne Seck, as the student works at his many-year task of memorizing the Koran.  It is estimated that there are over 50,000 begging talibé children in Senegal, over 7,000 in Saint Louis alone.

One child in particular touched my heart.  He was always the first kid to arrive at Maison de la Gare's centre.  I can't speak Wolof, which is the most widely spoken language in Senegal.  We have never really talked to each other, but there was a rapport between us that required no language.   He liked to grab my arm to put around his shoulder.  He was said to have mental problems; however, all I could see was an innocent young boy with hope in his piercing eyes.

It is too easy to photograph the talibé children as a cliché - photographing them with broken limbs, begging on the street, or with a close-up of an unhappy face.  This might not be far from the truth.  However, there are also happy faces behind that hardship.

I hope that my photographs have portrayed these children in a more intimate light that is both dignified and honest.


MDG founder Issa Kouyate entering a daara
MDG founder Issa Kouyate entering a daara
Talibe children in a Saint Louis daara
Talibe children in a Saint Louis daara
Marabout Seck instructing a child
Marabout Seck instructing a child
A child who touched Jack
A child who touched Jack's heart
Facing a difficult life with dignity and spirit
Facing a difficult life with dignity and spirit
Talibes at play - Soccer matches organized by MDG
Talibes at play - Soccer matches organized by MDG
Talibe children of Saint Louis
Talibe children of Saint Louis

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