International Childcare Trust

International Childcare Trust (ICT) believes that all children, regardless of socio-economic background, have the right to enjoy their childhood and reach their potential. We partner with local grassroots NGOs in Africa and Asia - managed and staffed by local people - that protect children's rights. We combine the delivery of practical assistance with capacity building and advocacy initiatives because we take responsibility for building sustainability into the projects/partners we support.
Aug 17, 2011

Supporting children and their families in Pondicherry, southern India

Playtime at Kalki
Playtime at Kalki

Kalki Welfare Society supports approximately 700 children living in Pondicherry and nearby districts.  Here are two of their stories.

Shelter: Subashni (5 years old)

Subashni’s mother is a sex worker and her father is a rickshaw driver and also an alcoholic. They have an extremely unstable lifestyle and because of this Kalki’s social workers encouraged the parents to enrol Subashni in Kalki’s Early Childhood Day Care Programme. 

Subashni was recently diagnosed with TB after being referred to the local hospital by Kalki’s nurse.  When Subashni’s mother heard of the illness she decided she could no longer care for the child and refused to go to the hospital to sign for her daughter’s medicine.  Despite constant mediation from the outreach team and attempts to ease her worries, Subashni’s mother refused to assist.  The girl was admitted into the Kalki night shelter to ensure that her health could be monitored, as well as providing her with nutritious food and a clean environment in which to live.

Today Subashni is healthy thanks to the conscientious work of Kalki’s nurse and carers.  She is now able to play with other children at the shelter and has made many friends.  Thanks to the stability and routine of shelter life, she is also developing well emotionally.  The social workers are continuing to discuss Subashni’s situation with her mother and are in the process of developing a long-term developmental plan for her, to ensure that she has the best possible opportunities in life.

Outreach: Poomani (13 years old)

Poomani has been selling bags in Pondicherry since she was eight years old and has not attended school since then.   She lives with her community more than 20km out of town and regularly makes the long, tiring trip into Pondicherry.  Then, over three to four days, she sells bags in the heat and sleeps on the streets at night before heading home.  On a number of occasions, she has been abused at night and often goes a whole day without food or water.

Kalki’s social workers met Poomani one day when she was out working.  They told her about the drop-in centre and that she could visit anytime for lunch or a rest.  However, she was scared that her parents would find out and she would be punished.

Therefore, the outreach team made the journey to Poomani’s community to start building a relationship with the children and adults.  They took recreational activities for the children to enjoy and develop their social skills as well as informal educational materials to provide basic tuition.  They began working regularly with the parents to build up their trust and inform them about Kalki’s programmes.

The next time Poomani came into Pondicherry she visited the Centre.  She told the social workers that her parents had given her permission to come to Kalki for the afternoon as they knew the Centre could be trusted, that she would be fed and could rest safely. 

With time, the social workers will begin to tailor a developmental plan for Poomani to ensure she has a safe and happy future.  In the meantime, she has somewhere safe to visit during her days in Pondicherry.

Jul 11, 2011

I am now able to stand on my own...

A women
A women's savings and credit co-operative

Life after captivity - Nabulungi’s story

Nabulungi is from Madi Kiloc, a small village in northern Uganda.  On 3rd July 1998 she was abducted by the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army) and spent six years in captivity.  During this time, as well as taking part in battles with local tribes, she was forced to become the wife of a commander with whom she had two children.  Having escaped and been rehabilitated, she was referred to International Childcare Trust's partner, KICWA, for reunification.  Nabulungi is one of hundreds of vulnerable women and children who have been supported by Education & Training for Communities in Uganda.

 “After reunification in the community life went from good to worse with constant insults and humiliation on me and my children.  I was discriminated from community services such as from water points and the market; I was called by humiliating names that always made me furious and aggressive.  There was no stable income which I could depend on to meet my children’s basic needs; I always did casual work in people’s gardens in order get some food and money.  The fate of my life improved when KICWA, in their follow up visit, identified the problems and came in for my rescue; through dialogue they sensitized my neighbours and friends; they supported my family by organising a cleansing ceremony.

“In 2008 KICWA identified me to benefit from livelihoods support so that I become liberated from a lack of income; I opened up a restaurant which gives me Shs20,000 (£5) every day; from the savings I managed to buy iron sheets and plan to build a shelter for my mother and my children; and I was also able to buy some livestock and birds which I will sell in the future for much higher prices.  With all these resources I am now able to stand on my own to meet the demands of my children and am able to buy food for my family.  I dream of seeing my children reach their highest level of education and want to build my own restaurant to minimize the cost of renting.”

 

Life after captivity - Nabulungi’s story

 

Nabulungi is from Madi Kiloc, a small village in northern Uganda.  On 3rd July 1998 she was abducted by the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army) and spent six years in captivity.  During this time, as well as taking part in battles with local tribes, she was forced to become the wife of a commander with whom she had two children.  Having escaped and been rehabilitated, she was referred to ICT’s partner, KICWA, for reunification.

 

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“After reunification in the community life went from good to worse with constant insults and humiliation on me and my children.  I was discriminated from community services such as from water points and the market; I was called by humiliating names that always made me furious and aggressive.  There was no stable income which I could depend on to meet my children’s basic needs; I always did casual work in people’s gardens in order get some food and money.  The fate of my life improved when KICWA, in their follow up visit, identified the problems and came in for my rescue; through dialogue they sensitized my neighbours and friends; they supported my family by organising a cleansing ceremony.

 

“In 2008 KICWA identified me to benefit from livelihoods support so that I become liberated from a lack of income; I opened up a restaurant which gives me Shs20,000 (£5) every day; from the savings I managed to buy iron sheets and plan to build a shelter for my mother and my children; and I was also able to buy some livestock and birds which I will sell in the future for much higher prices.  With all these resources I am now able to stand on my own to meet the demands of my children and am able to buy food for my family.  I dream of seeing my children reach their highest level of education and want to build my own restaurant to minimize the cost of renting.”

Links:

Jun 22, 2011

M'Lop Tapang Update

Girl smiling
Girl smiling

The Tapang tree, also known as the ‘umbrella’ tree, provides shelter from the elements.  M’Lop means shade or protection in the Khmer language.

M'Lop Tapang was created in 2003 with the aim of giving street children access to the learning tools, resources, and opportunities they needed to build a better future. It offers regular meals, shelter, medical care, education, counseling, and protection from all types of abuse.  Additionally, M'Lop Tapang works to increase awareness in the community about issues affecting street children.

Today M'Lop Tapang works with over 2,500 street living and working young people and their families at nine centres in the Sihanoukville area.  It works closely with schools, the police and local authorities to help make the community a safer place for all children.

As we are still endeavoring to raise the money required to buy a new mobile library, here are a few statistics about M'Lop Tapang's work from the last month:

  • 2,033 children attended educational activities
  • 51 children slept safely in M'Lop Tapang's two Night Shelters
  • 1,137 children were treated in the Medical Clinic
  • 65 youth participated in vocational training programmes
  • 70 calls were made to the 24-Hour Confidential Hotline
  • 44 community members were certified in ChildSafe training
  • 425 youths participated in drug awareness training
  • 14 children were reintegrated back into their families

For more info, please visit: http://www.mloptapang.org


Links:

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