Cheetah Conservation Fund

To be the internationally recognized centre of excellence in the conservation of cheetahs and their ecosystems. CCF will work with all stakeholders to develop best practices in research, education, and land use to benefit all species, including people. CCF works to: create and manage long-term conservation strategies for the cheetah; develop and implement livestock management practices that eliminate the need for ranchers to kill cheetah; conduct education programs for locals; continue research in genetics, biology, species survival
Dec 19, 2011

Wild Mum

CCF has worked for two decades to teach farmers to coexist with cheetahs—and those efforts are paying dividends. A while back a livestock farmer became alarmed by the presence of a cheetah we later dubbed Wild Mumand her two cubs near his livestock kraal. Rather than killing them on site, the farmer trapped them and contacted CCF. A medical exam at our vet clinic revealed that Wild Mum had a badly infected broken tooth, which more than likely was why she had resorted to killing livestock insteadof wildlife. We had Wild Mum’s tooth repaired and fitted her with a satellite collar programmed to automatically drop off in five months. Then, Mum and her cubs were released on an unfenced portion of CCF’s property. When we knew the collar had dropped off, we wentto locate the collar. To our surprise, we sighted Wild Mum and found a new litter of three young cubs hidden securely in a bush. Her previous cubs must have struck out on their own, as all eventually do.  We hoped to be able to keep track of the cubs, but without their mother’s collar, that would prove difficult.  Just recently, though, this feline family was identified in a photo taken by a camera trap.  As infant mortality for cheetahs ranges from 75 to 95 percent, the fact that all three young ones are still alive is truly miraculous. As a result of your support, CCF’s efforts ensured five new cheetahs have a chance to blossom in the wild.

Links:


Attachments:
Oct 12, 2011

Springtime in Namibia!

Worth his weight in gold
Worth his weight in gold

It's springtime in Namibia, and in addition to a slew of baby goats, we've had two litters of puppies at CCF and a third is "in the oven". The first group was recently vaccinated and spayed or neutered and given out to farmers around Namibia. (The farmers attend Puppy Day at CCF to learn how to take care of and train their new charge.) The next litter will follow soon. After nursing and caring for these little ones for two months, we all grow attached, but we know they are going on to do the greatest work--saving an endangered species. These adorable little pups will grow up to be so protective of their goat and sheep herds that they will fight to the death if they have to. Luckily they don't usually have to do more than bark. We have three new females at CCF as well as an intact female in the southern part of the country, so we hope to increase the number of litters we have each year. Even after giving out these three litters, we'll still have a waiting list of more than 100 farmers. Thank you for your support of this critical project! Please spread the word. 

A farmer picks up his pup from CCF
A farmer picks up his pup from CCF
Sep 26, 2011

CCF's orphaned cheetahs

Currently, CCF has 52 cheetahs that were either orphaned or injured and came to CCF to be cared for. That number is slightly down from a year or two ago due to CCF's "rewilding" program. We developed a very successful protocol that allows cheetahs that have been in captivity to relearn to hunt and protect themselves in a safe area. Then after they are released into the wild, they are tracked daily to ensure that they can feed themselves. Feeding 52 cheetahs is very expensive. But another expense to consider is fencing!  While we don't like to see cheetahs behind fences, sometimes it is necessary.  Namibia has a law that requires one hectare (2.5 acres) per cheetah. We keep the majority of "our" cheetahs in enclosures that are much larger than the legal minimum, which means that we have a lot of fencing to install and maintain. (Just imagine what a warthog can do to a fence--it isn't pretty.) Fencing prices have really gone up in the last few years. So we greatly appreciate your donations. While we work on finding ways to return cheetahs to the wild, we make sure that their stay at CCF is as safe as possible. Thank you!

donate now:

Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $20
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $100
    give
  • $200
    give
  • $5,000
    give
  • $20
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $100
    each month
    give
  • $200
    each month
    give
  • $5,000
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Cheetah Conservation Fund

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Cheetah Conservation Fund on GreatNonProfits.org.